NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Shares of PepsiCo (PEP) - Get Report are increasing by 1.1% to $102.49 early Wednesday afternoon, despite data showing that U.S. soda consumption tumbled to a 30-year low in 2015.

American consumers have been seeking out healthier beverages, such as flavored water and juices, which don't have as many calories as soda.

Overall sales of carbonated soft drinks dropped for the 11th straight year in 2015, according to a new report from industry tracker Beverage Digest, Fortune reported.

Total volumes slipped by 1.2% last year vs. a 0.9% decline in 2014.

Purchase, NY-based Pepsi had the sharpest drop among the largest soda makers with a 3.1% volume decrease, Fortune noted. Coca-Cola Co.'s (KO) decline was 1% and Dr Pepper Snapple Group's (DPS) drop was 0.1% for 2015.

Separately, Pepsi will add 1893 Original Cola and 1893 Ginger Cola sodas to retail locations across the country.

The new soda is named for the year Pepsi was founded. It comes in slender 12 ounce cans and its ingredients include kola nuts, certified fair trade sugar and sparkling water, TheStreet's Brian Sozzi wrote in an article yesterday.

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Separately, TheStreet Ratings Team has a "Buy" rating with a score of A- on PepsiCo.

This is based on the convergence of positive investment measures, which should help this stock outperform the majority of stocks rated.

The company's strengths can be seen in multiple areas, such as its solid stock price performance, increase in net income, notable return on equity, expanding profit margins and growth in earnings per share.

The team believes its strengths outweigh the fact that the company has had generally high debt management risk by most measures that were evaluated.

Recently, TheStreet Ratings objectively rated this stock according to its "risk-adjusted" total return prospect over a 12-month investment horizon. Not based on the news in any given day, the rating may differ from Jim Cramer's view or that of this articles's author.

You can view the full analysis from the report here: PEP

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