The Night Watch: i2, 3Com Bounce Back After Rough Days - TheStreet

Three companies left the opening bell traveling at a constant rate of speed.

One,

i2 Technologies

(ITWO)

, got blindsided by an announcement from

Ford

(F) - Get Report

,

General Motors

(GM) - Get Report

and

DaimlerChrysler

(DCX)

. The Big Three plan to create an online commerce site. i2, which already has a deal in place with

Toyota

(TM) - Get Report

, fell 14.7% on news that it was left out of the deal.

The two others,

Oracle

(ORCL) - Get Report

and

Commerce One

(CMRC)

, raced ahead more than 14% each on the news that Ford traded half of its stake in Oracle for half of GM's stake in Commerce One.

If all three companies, which started at a constant rate, ended the day session at dramatically different levels, then how would each fare in after-hours?

All three rose.

i2 improved 3 7/16 to 153 7/8 on 34,000 shares. Oracle gained 17/64 to 70 7/8 on 44,000 shares while Commerce One gained 5 3/8 to 218 on 34,000 shares.

Large-cap algebra was all the rage as many day-session losers and winners practiced their addition and subtraction skills. Er, mostly subtraction skills.

3Com

(COMS)

, off 2.8% during the day, turned bad to better with a gain of 1 1/2 to 82 1/8 on 31,000 shares on Island. Earlier in the evening, it was off more than a point.

Popular B2B play

Internet Capital Group

(ICGE)

had a rough day, dropping 10% on last night's earnings release, in which the company said it expected losses to continue. Tonight, Internet Capital continued to slide, gaining 21/32 to 107 1/2 on 28,000 shares.

And IPO winner

Intersil Holding

(ISIL)

was a loser in the postclose session, easing 7/64 to 54 on 39,000 shares on Island. During the day, the wireless chipmaker more than doubled from its offering price of 25. It finished up 29 to 54.

The popularity of the typewriter, that unpretentious newsroom staple circa

All the President's Men

, has gone the way of

Robert Redford's

youth. Despite posturing otherwise, both have lost something that can never be regained.

Almost two weeks ago,

Smith Corona

(SCCO) - Get Report

, a brand-name typewriter manufacturer, announced the hiring of

Deloitte & Touche

to help it boost the stock price. This move essentially puts Smith Corona on the auction block, causing investors to salivate about a buyout.

The company has had stock problems for a half-decade. After filing for Chapter 11 protection in July 1995, the company was delisted in June 1996 during a reorganization period and then relisted in May 1997. Upon the resumption of trading, Smith Corona did all right, hitting a post-relisting high of 8 in November 1997. Then the typewriter maker had an

annus horribilis

in 1998, losing 74% of its stock value, leaving it worth less than 2 bucks, where it has languished ever since.

Tonight, Smith Corona pushed above 2 for the first time in a long time, as investors speculate that a buyer has been found. It rose 1 5/32 to 2 7/32 on 2 million shares on Island ECN. This volume is notable, but really nothing new in the wake of the Feb. 14 announcement. Over the nine trading days since then, the company's average daily volume increased nearly 600% from 1999's daily average.

Since 5:30 p.m. EST,

Value America

(VUSA)

has sprinted up Island's charts like

Ben Johnson

after a 'roid cocktail. The e-tailer rose 1 1/2 to 5 on 154,000 shares after announcing it had been selected as an

IBM

(IBM) - Get Report

"fulfillment partner." Earlier, it had been up more than 3 points.

Per the terms of the agreement, Value America will fulfill all of IBM's commitments for all state government purchases made by either New York or Pennsylvania. All individual competition is essentially restricted by the terms of the deal, which enables Value America to sell all of IBM's merchandise at a pre-established contract price.

This news was released shortly after 5:30 p.m., sending the stock's volume skyrocketing from almost nothing to the No. 6 spot on Island's most-active list.

Island ECN, owned by Datek Online, offers trading, mainly in Nasdaq-listed stocks, from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. EST.

.

Confused?

TheStreet.com

explains how the rules change when the sun goes down in Investing Basics: Night Owl, a section devoted to after-hours trading.