Nasdaq Closes at Record in Mixed Christmas Eve Trading

The Nasdaq closes at an all-time high in mixed trading in Tuesday's shortened Christmas Eve session.
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  1. The Nasdaq closed at an all-time high in mixed trading in Tuesday's shortened Christmas Eve session.
  2.  The Nasdaq has finished at all-time highs for nine consecutive trading days.
  3. Boeing is Real Money's Stock of the Day. The plane maker formally has told suppliers to halt shipments of 737 MAX parts for a month.

The Nasdaq closed at an all-time high in mixed trading in Tuesday's shortened Christmas Eve session.

The Nasdaq finished up 0.08% to 8,952.88 after hitting an intraday all-time high of 8,957.12 earlier in the session.

Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) - Get Report was the Nasdaq's top gainer after an analyst at RBC Capital Markets increased his price target on the stock to $53 from $50.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average finished down 36 points, or 0.13%, to 28,515, and the S&P 500 fell 0.02%.

Stock markets in the U.S. closed at 1 p.m. ET on Tuesday and will be be closed for Christmas Day on Wednesday.

Stocks closed Monday at record highs on optimism that a "phase one" trade agreement between the U.S. and China would be signed soon, and after the Dow got a lift from a rise in Boeing (BA) - Get Report, following the firing of the plane maker's CEO amid the 737 MAX fallout.

The S&P 500 finished Monday's session at a record -- its third straight -- and the Nasdaq closed at a record for the ninth consecutive trading day.

“Right now, a lot of people have gone home for the year and the path of least resistance is higher,” said Sameer Samana, senior global market strategist at Wells Fargo Investment Institute. “It’s hard to see any kind of meaningful trend change between now and the end of the year.”

Boeing finished down Tuesday and was the Dow's biggest loser.

The company has instituted more MAX 737-related damage-control measures, formally telling suppliers Monday to halt shipments of MAX parts for a month, just hours after ousting CEO Dennis Muilenburg and days after announcing it was halting production of the grounded plane.

A New York state judge struck down a New York City rule that would have limited how much time Uber (UBER) - Get Report, Lyft (LYFT) - Get Report and other for-hire vehicles could spend without passengers in the busiest parts of the city.

State Supreme Court Judge Lyle Frank called the city’s cruising cap “arbitrary and capricious.” The rule was expected to take effect in 2020.

Uber, meanwhile, said Tuesday that former CEO Travis Kalanick would be leaving the board, effective Dec. 31, to focus on "his new business and philanthropic endeavors."