NEW YORK (

TheStreet

) -- Stocks finished in the red on "Black Friday" as eurozone contagion fears and escalating tensions in Korea overshadowed a strong holiday shopping season in the U.S..

The

Dow Jones Industrial Average

shed 95 points, or 0.8%, to close the abbreviated trading session at 11,092. The

S&P 500

fell 9 points, or 0.8%, to 1,189. The

Nasdaq Composite

gave back 8 points, or 0.8%, to settle at 2534.

The Dow wrapped the holiday-shortened trading week 1% lower as negative news abroad offset a spate of strong economic data at home.

Cisco Systems

(CSCO) - Get Report

and

Microsoft

(MSFT) - Get Report

showed modest gains within the Dow.

JPMorgan Chase

(JPM) - Get Report

,

American Express

(AXP) - Get Report

and

DuPont

(DD) - Get Report

were the session's biggest laggards among the blue chips.

U.S. markets were closed on Thursday for the Thanksgiving holiday. On Wednesday, stocks rallied on a sharp drop in initial jobless claims and improved consumer sentiment ahead of the holiday season.

But contagion fears and geopolitical concerns snapped back into focus on Friday.

Global stocks

fell sharply as markets questioned whether the European Union and the International Monetary Fund will be able to support other debt-logged eurozone countries if they ask for an aid plan similar to Ireland's.

Investors focused on

Portugal

despite repeated assurance from Prime Minister Jose Socrates that the country was not intending to seek bailout funds.

Concerns that Spain, the euro-zone's fourth largest economy, might also be forced to ask for a bailout also loomed large. The cost to insure Spanish and Portuguese government debt against default rose to a record,

Bloomberg News

reported, citing data provider CMA.

Meanwhile, Standard & Poor's cut ratings of bonds of

Anglo Irish Bank

to junk and downgraded

Bank of Ireland

(IRE)

and

Allied Irish Bank

(AIB)

by one notch each to BBB+ and BBB respectively.

In Asia, hostilities mounted on the Korean peninsula after North Korea's news agency said planned naval exercises involving South Korea and the U.S. could bring the region to "the brink of war." On Tuesday, North Korean soldiers fired artillery at a South Korean island and killed four people.

"Contagion concerns in the overseas markets and more tension in Korea has the few of us who are working today worried," said Peter Tuz of Chase Investment Counsel. He said early reports seemed to suggest that retailers were seeing a strong holiday shopping season. However, global concerns were dominating concerns on Friday. In any case, it would be hard to read too much into market action on Friday. "On a day like today, when trading volume is light, the moves tend to be exaggerated on either direction," said Tuz.

The euro weakened against the dollar, dropping 0.9 % to $1.3238. The dollar strengthened against a basket of currencies, with the dollar index rising 0.8%.

Overseas, Hong Kong's Hang Seng lost 0.8%, and Japan's Nikkei shed 0.4%. European markets were paring losses but were still trading weak. The FTSE in London and the DAX in Frankfurt shed 0.5% each.

With no economic reports scheduled, investors in the U.S. were focused on retail stocks this Black Friday. Expectations for strong sales during the traditional kickoff of the holiday shopping season are high compared with a year ago.

Retailers were mixed with

Wal-Mart

(WMT) - Get Report

,

Target

(TGT) - Get Report

closing weaker, while

Amazon

(AMZN) - Get Report

inched slightly higher.

Energy, basic materials and financials were among the worst performers.

Exxon Mobil

(XOM) - Get Report

and

Chevron

(CVX) - Get Report

shed 0.9% and 1% respectively while

BP

(BP) - Get Report

fell 1.1%. BP said Friday that it had been awarded a 100% interest in the North Arafura oil and gas production sharing contract in onshore Papua Province, Indonesia.

Freeport McMoran

(FCX) - Get Report

and

BHP Billiton

(BHP) - Get Report

shed 2.6% and 2% respectively, on the back of

weakness in base metals.

Del Monte Foods

(DLM)

, the pet food and consumer products manufacturer,

agreed to be taken over by a group of investors led by private equity firm

KKR

(KKR) - Get Report

for $4 billion. KKR will pay $19 per share in cash, a 5% premium to Wednesday's closing price. Shares rose 4.6% to close at 18.80.

CPI International (CPII)

soared 33% to $19.29 after it agreed to be acquired by an affiliate of Veritas Capital for $19.50 a share, or $525 million.

Shares of

Ford

(F) - Get Report

gained 0.9% to $16.09. The company

plans to add 66 dealerships in China before the end of the year, according to a

Wall Street Journal

report.

Shares of

Boeing

(BA) - Get Report

shed 0.7% to $64.50. The

Wall Street Journal

said the company is modifying portions of the electrical system on its forthcoming Dreamliner. An in-flight fire aboard a test plane two weeks ago through its delivery timeline off schedule.

In commodity markets, the January crude oil contract was down by 14 cents to trade at $83.72 a barrel. The December gold contract was down by $14.50 to $1,358.50 an ounce.

The benchmark 10-year Treasury note strengthened 12/32, diluting the yield to 2.868%.

.

--Written by Melinda Peer and Shanthi Bharatwaj in New York

.

Disclosure: TheStreet's editorial policy prohibits staff editors and reporters from holding positions in any individual stocks.