Here's this week's update for the exchange-traded funds that track U.S. Treasury bond yields, gold bullion, utility stocks and junk bonds. These "flight to safety" investment choices began last week lower, but then rebounded.

The yield on the 30-year U.S. bond traded as high as 2.586% last Monday, above its 200-day simple moving average of 2.509%. This week begins with the yield below its 200-day simple moving average of 2.507% and above its 50-day simple moving average of 2.363%. This week's value level is 2.549%.

Investors can trade the U.S. Treasury 30-year bond like a stock using the 20+ Year Treasury Bond ETF (TLT) - Get iShares 20+ Year Treasury Bond ETF Report , an ETF backed by a basket of U.S. Treasury bonds with maturities of 20 years to 30 years. As a stock-type investment, it never matures, and interest income is converted to periodic dividend payments.

Comex gold futures ended last week fractionally above the 200-day simple moving average of $1,266.2. This key moving average has been a magnet since Oct. 6, when the average was $1,256.0. Gold futures were just below the 200-day simple moving average of $1,267.0 in premarket trading this morning. My value level for the fourth quarter is $1,215.7, with my risky level for this week of $1,272.2.

Investors can trade gold like a stock using the SPDR Gold Shares ETF (GLD) - Get SPDR Gold Trust Report , which is backed by gold bullion.

The Dow utility average has been below its 200-day simple moving average since Oct. 4, and this key moving average is now a resistance at 660.62. The low for the move has been 638.22, set on Oct. 6. This week's pivot is 659.29, with key levels of 635.23 and 670.81 still the neutral zone.

Investors seeking the safety of dividends can trade the Utilities Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLU) - Get Utilities Select Sector SPDR Fund Report , which is a basket of 28 utility stocks.

Investors betting that junk bond yields will tighten against U.S. Treasury bonds should consider the SPDR Barclays High Yield Bond ETF (JNK) - Get SPDR Bloomberg Barclays High Yield Bond ETF Report . Keep in mind that the performance of junk bonds correlates to the stock market, not to the bond market. This ETF set its 2016 high of $36.86 on Oct. 20, with the 50-day simple moving average of $36.52.

The year-to-date gain for the S&P 500 SPDR ETF (SPY) - Get SPDR S&P 500 ETF Trust Report moved up to 4.8% last week, up from 4.5% on Oct. 14. The weekly chart continues to be negative. The "flight to safety" investments rebounded last week with the U.S. Treasury bond ETF, the gold ETF and the utility stocks ETF still outperforming the S&P 500 ETF. The year-to-date gains are 10.6%, 19.1% and 10.9%, respectively, up from of 9.1%, 17.6% and 10.3%, respectively, a week ago.

Here's the weekly chart for the bond ETF.

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Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The weekly chart is negative, with the bond ETF below its key weekly moving average of $135.14. It is well above its 200-day simple moving average of $120.02. The weekly momentum reading ended last week at 23.44, down from 30.17 on Oct. 14. The uptrend line at the upper portion of the chart shows that the bond rally stalled above resistance of $141.98 during the week of July 16. The uptrend connecting the higher weekly lows comes in at $126.69 this week.

Investors looking to buy the bond ETF should continue to do so on weakness to $122.31, which is in play until the end of 2016. The other key annual level of $132.45 remains a magnet, crossed again last week. 

Investors looking to reduce holdings should consider doing so on strength to $142.11, which is the risky level for the remainder of the year.

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Here's the weekly chart for the gold ETF.

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Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The weekly chart is negative, with the gold bullion ETF below its key weekly moving average of $123.31, and below its 200-week simple moving average of $122.72. The ETF had been above this key moving average between the week of July 1 and the week of Sept. 30. The weekly momentum reading ended last week at 23.57, down from 28.94 on Oct. 14.

Investors looking to buy the gold ETF should do so on weakness to $115.64, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of 2016. Investors looking to reduce holdings should consider doing so on strength to $139.16, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of October.

Here's the weekly chart for the utilities ETF.

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Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The weekly chart for utilities is negative bur oversold, with the utilities ETF below its key weekly moving average of $48.81. This ETF continues to be well above its 200-week simple moving average of $43.03. The weekly momentum reading ended last week at 19.05, down from 21.29 on Oct. 14, falling below the oversold threshold of 20.00.

Investors looking to buy the utilities ETF should do so on weakness to $43.03, which is the 200-week simple moving average. Investors looking to reduce holdings should consider selling strength to $51.19 and $51.46, which are key levels on technical charts until the end of 2016.

Here's the weekly chart for the junk bond ETF.

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Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The weekly chart for the junk bond ETF remains positive but overbought, with the ETF above its key weekly moving average of $36.53, and still well below its 200-week simple moving average of $38.66. This ETF has been below its 200-week SMA since the week of Nov. 14, 2014, as the junk bond bubble was popping. Back then the 200-week SMA was $40.16. The weekly momentum reading ended last week at 88.03, up slightly from 87.09 on Oct. 14.

Investors looking to buy the junk bond ETF should do so on weakness to $32.98, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of 2016. The $36.46 level should remain a magnet until the end of the year. Investors looking to reduce holdings should do so on strength to $37.89, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of October.

This article is commentary by an independent contributor. At the time of publication, the author held no positions in the stocks mentioned.