May 2006

<I>TheStreet.com</I> corrects its errors.
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A May 31 story, Price Cuts No Panacea for Game Makers, incorrectly stated Electronic Arts released FIFA Soccer 06 for the Xbox 360 last month. In fact, the company released the game in November. EA released another game, FIFA World Cup 2006, last month. That game, unlike FIFA Soccer 06, still carries a retail price of about $60. TheStreet.com regrets the error. (Corrected May 31)

A May 29 story,

Investing on Faith, incorrectly stated that George Schwartz, portfolio manager for the Ave Maria Funds, is based in Cincinnati. In fact, he is based in Bloomfield Hills, Mich.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected May 30)

A May 23 story,

Emerging Concern on Overseas Investments, incorrectly stated the

iShares MSCI Brazil Index

(EWZ:NYSE) has been dropping in price for the past three months. If fact, the ETF peaked on May 9 and has been going down the past two weeks.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error. (

Corrected May 23

)

A May 18 story,

Vonage Plays to its Fans for IPO, incorrectly suggested that the company was counting on no more than a quarter of its customers paying $16,000 to $18,000 for the minimum number of IPO shares. In fact, customers would be paying $1,600 to $1,800 for the minimum 100 shares within the $16-to-$18-a-share range.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error. (

Corrected May 18

)

A May 15 story,

"NYSE Still Pays Well," contained inaccurate information. Based on research by Bear Stearns, the story incorrectly said the average employee of

NYSE Group

(NYX:NYSE) earns $303,190 a year. In fact, according to a revised Bear Stearns report, the average salary is $179,200. As a result, employees at the

New York Stock Exchange

parent are the third-best paid among workers at major publicly traded securities exchanges, behind those at the

International Securities Exchange

(ISE:NYSE) and

MarketAccess

(MKTX:Nasdaq). Average pay at the NYSE Group is also below all of the Wall Street securities firms mentioned in the article.

TheStreet.com

regrets the errors. (

Corrected May 18

)

A May 12 column,

The Real Story: Potash Has China Syndrome

stated that

Potash Corp. of Saskatchewan

(POT:NYSE) owns 54% of Canpotex. In fact, Potash receives 54% of the allocation that Canpotex receives from the Chinese government, but only owns one-third of the consortium.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.(

Corrected May 12

)

A May 11 story,

Death Spiral Convertible Just Refuses to Die,  incorrectly described a recent private placement by

Valence Technology

(VLNC:Nasdaq) as a death spiral convertible bond. While the note does include a "floating" conversion feature, the $6 million note also includes a provision that prevents its conversion price from "spiraling" lower.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error. (

Corrected May 12

)

A May 11 story,

McCaw Files for WiMax IPO, misstated 2005 revenue at wireless broadband company Clearwire. The story originally reported 2005 total revenue at Clearwire as $8.5 million. But the company actually posted revenue of $33.4 million, comprising $8.5 million in service revenue and $25 million in equipment sales.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error. (

Corrected May 12

)

A headline on a May 10 story,

Crude Dips on Inventory Data, incorrectly said crude oil prices ended lower Wednesday. In fact, crude prices ended higher.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error. (

Corrected May 10

)

A May 9 column by John Reese,

Get Your Oil and Gas Down Under, failed to disclose that Reese held shares of

Chevron

(CVX:NYSE) at the time of the column's publication.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected May 9)

The May 8 recaps of

Mad Money and the TV show's

Lightning Round segment misidentified a stock that Jim Cramer mentioned. The stock should have been identified as

Level 3 Communications

(LVLT:Nasdaq), not

L3-Communications Holdings

(LLL:NYSE).

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected May 9)

Two May 8 stories,

Stocks Sag Despite Megamergers and

Stocks Start Week in Neutral, incorrectly said the

Federal Open Market Committee

will meet Tuesday, May 9. The committee's next meeting is Wednesday.

TheStreet.com

regrets the errors. (

Corrected May 9

)

A May 8 story,

Fluor Profit Nearly Triples, incorrectly said

Fluor

(FLR:NYSE) narrowed its 2006 guidance range to $2.90 to $3 a share from $2.80 to $3.10 a share. In fact, the company adjusted its range upward, to $2.90 to $3.20 a share, from $2.80 to $3.10 a share.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error. (

Corrected May 9

)

A May 8 column,

Iceland Warms Up Its Welcome, incorrectly said Glitnir Bank was Iceland's third-largest bank. It is the country's second largest bank.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected May 8)

A May 2 article,

Contracts Catapult EDS, incorrectly reported that the company's first-quarter earnings-per-share result and second-quarter EPS estimate were above First Call estimates. In fact, First Call included stock-compensation expense in its estimate, so both figures were below Wall Street expectations.

TheStreet.com

regrets the errors.

(Corrected May 3)

A May 1 article,

Wal-Mart Sparks Retail Optimism, incorrectly stated that

Wal-Mart

(WMT:NYSE) reported a preliminary 4.8% increase in same-store sales for April. In fact, the world's largest retailer reported a 6.8% gain for the month.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected May 2)

In a May 1 broadcast of CNBC's "Mad Money," as recounted in

Cramer's 'Mad Money' Recap: Ethanol Alchemy, there was an error. Jim Cramer said on the show that

MGP Ingredients

(MGPI:Nasdaq) processes cellulose waste into ethanol; in fact, the principal raw material is corn, which MGP blends with residual starch from its wheat protein and starch processing operations to form ethanol. Also, to clarify: MGP did not purchase a stake in Iogen, a company that turns celloluse into ethanol. Goldman Sachs purchased a stake in Iogen.

TheStreet.com

regrets the errors.

(Corrected May 3)