Increasing violence in the Middle East, along with acts of terrorism and more bad earnings news, crushed the market today.

The

Dow Jones Industrial Average plummeted 380 points. It was crippled by

Home Depot's

(HD) - Get Report

news this morning that slower sales -- from lower lumber prices -- had forced it to revise its earnings outlook downward. The stock fell 28.5%. The news rocked the retail sector and sent fellow blue-chip

Wal-Mart

(WMT) - Get Report

and other retailers downward. The

S&P Retail Index

was down 7.7%.

The Dow's financial components also weighed heavily on it.

J.P. Morgan

(JPM) - Get Report

took away about 64 points, while

Citigroup

(C) - Get Report

and

American Express

(AXP) - Get Report

, took away a total of about 33 points.

"The bottom line is, financials do well when everything else is good," said Brad Zipper, a trader at

Herzog Heine Geduld

. "They are just going to have to suffer with all the rest."

Meanwhile, crude oil prices spiked from the renewed fighting between the Israelis and Palestinians, and also because of a suspected terrorist bombing of the U.S. Navy destroyer U.S.S. Cole. Four U.S. soldiers were killed in the incident and 11 are missing.

The U.S. is highly dependent on the OPEC nations for oil; and the political uncertainty surrounding the Middle East is provoking investors to hike oil prices. A petroleum workers' strike in Venezuela is exacerbating the situation; as that country is also a member of OPEC. November crude oil futures traded on the

New York Mercantile Exchange

were lately trading at $36.15, up from $33.25.

The increase in oil prices boosted oil sectors, but flattened transports and airline stocks. The

Dow Jones Transportation Average

was lately down 2.7%, while the

American Stock Exchange Airline Index

was 3.9% lower.

Lately, tech stocks have been the naysayers on the market -- garnering all of the investor attention -- but today, tech stocks had a little pressure taken off them on news last night of better-than-expected earnings from

Advanced Micro Devices

(AMD) - Get Report

and

Applied Micro Circuits

(AMCC)

. More importantly, there was no nasty guidance on coming quarters. Even the shares of semiconductor bellwether and AMD's primary competitor,

Intel

(INTC) - Get Report

, were getting a lift, up 6.4%.

AMD, off 5.9%, also soothed fears of a slowdown in European demand in its conference call, saying it hadn't seen the kind of sales weakness that Intel partially blamed for its revised earnings forecast.

Sector Watch

The aforementioned oil stocks were about the only sectors seeing green today. The

American Stock Exchange Oil & Gas Index

was rising 1.7%, while the

Philadelphia Stock Exchange Oil Service Index

was jumping 2.6%.

Also, the oil price increase was lifting the

Morgan Stanley Commodity Related Equity Index

0.8%.

You can tell investors are freaking out by looking at gold. The

Philadelphia Stock Exchange Gold and Silver Index

was bouncing 5.4%.

Trouble in the financial sector was pushing down the

American Stock Exchange Broker/Dealer Index

4.4%, and the

Philadelphia Stock Exchange/KBW Bank Index

4.9%. That trouble spread into the

TheStreet.com E-Finance Index

, which was 7.1% lower.

NextCard

(NXCD)

down 16.3%,

DLJDirect

(DIR)

, 12.8% lower and

Wit Capital

(WITC)

, off 16.5%, were a couple of its badly hit components.

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Bonds/Economy

Treasuries recouped early losses and moved into positive territory following reports of escalating violence in the Middle East.

Bond and note prices starting moving sharply off their lows shortly after 9 a.m., when news services started reporting that Israeli helicopter gunships were firing on the West Bank and that Palestinian President Yasir Arafat's headquarters in Gaza had been attacked. Arafat was reportedly unhurt.

As the world's safest and most liquid asset,

Treasury securities typically rally in response to reports of international strife. Short-maturity Treasuries, which are the most liquid, have benefited the most in today's action.

The bond rally is occurring in spite of the fact that oil prices spiked in response to the news. Because they are potentially inflationary, rising oil prices normally cause alarm in the bond market. Today, demand for safety and liquidity is trumping oil in the setting of bond prices.

The benchmark 10-year

Treasury note, down as much as 9/32 earlier, lately was up 2/32 at 100 7/32, dropping its yield to 5.719.

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