This column was originally published on RealMoney on June 6 at 11:49 a.m. EDT. It's being republished as a bonus for TheStreet.com readers.

The tug of war between slow but consistent growth and fast but inconsistent growth right now is being won by the former. That's how you see

Johnson & Johnson

(JNJ) - Get Report

holding its ground but

U.S. Steel

(X) - Get Report

getting killed or

Allegheny Technologies

(ATI) - Get Report

getting clocked. People are just looking for safety wherever they can find it.

Can't blame anyone. The question is, how nimble can you be? Can you jump into J&J and

Hershey

(HSY) - Get Report

and then jump out in time to catch

Apple

(AAPL) - Get Report

or

Network Appliance

(NTAP) - Get Report

? Are you able to leap from

MO

(MO) - Get Report

to momentum in tech in a single bound?

I always settle for an 18-month horizon for doing both ,but that might mean some serious pain, pain that can be alleviated by the Novocain of an all-beverage-and-cereal portfolio. But I can't get in and get out in time for

Action Alerts PLUS because of my trading restrictions. I have to take a beating at times. This is one of those times.

Still, I ponder the great rush to own all sorts of companies that have sub-par but consistent growth. Many of the drug companies have that: Check out

Pfizer

(PFE) - Get Report

,

Bristol

(BMY) - Get Report

,

Merck

(MRK) - Get Report

and

Wyeth

( WYE).

Many of the food companies have it too:

General Mills

(GIS) - Get Report

,

Campbell

(CPB) - Get Report

, Hershey and

Kraft

( KFT).

But nobody cares at the inflection point.

I am not railing against the market. If you can be nimble, go for it.

Remember, though, that the market always, in the end, rewards growth -- wherever it can find it. If you can get out of Network Appliance and Apple to get back in three months from now, terrific.

I can't.

So I won't.

P.S. from TheStreet.com Editor-in-Chief, Dave Morrow:

It's always been my opinion that it pays to have more -- not fewer -- expert market views and analyses when you're making investing or trading decisions. That's why I recommend you take advantage of our

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At the time of publication, Cramer was long Network Appliance.

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