The path to global domination unfolded at 8:07 AM EST this morning. It was at that hour that I got the day's first glimpse of

CNBC's

star reporter

David Faber

in a

Fargo

-esque cap.

Faber was performing what TV folks call a "stand-up" outside of the

Conrail

(CRR:NYSE) shareholders meeting in Philadelphia. For those interested in any news, Conrail shareholders are voting on a proposed merger with

CSX

(CSX:NYSE).

Norfolk Southern

(NSC:NYSE) would like to get Conrail itself, but the firm seems sweet on CSX.

Puppy-doggish on the best of days, Faber looked modestly comical as the freezing wind picked up and blew the flaps of his hat up like a cocker-spaniel with his head out the car window. It was 15 degrees outside, with a wind chill of

negative

15, and it only took a minute for Faber's ears to turn bright pink.

Now, fair reader, is this any way to report financial news? Is there any value added by having this great reporter stand out in the street and freeze his fingers off? Couldn't he have done the same story from some warm lobby?

A journalism professor once told me that it's my lot in life to stand out in the rain taking notes on the best of days. That's what reporters do. But that doesn't mean we have to put the same kind of effort into

looking

tortured on TV.

Financial news is immediate. You needed that scoop five minutes ago.

CNBC

is virtual wallpaper in the financial world, because they're often out there cranking out financial news as it breaks. Until recently, that was as good as it could get.

But if you're reading this, you too have discovered that the Internet cranks on financial news too. Not just here on

The Street

, but all over the Web.

And the path to global domination can be seen. The competition is wasting time getting prettied up while we're working the phones. Soon enough, Faber will be back indoors working the phones himself. But today we're one more day up on him. And counting.

As for today's markets, stock prices are higher, boosted by solid earnings and signs of modest economic growth.

By Cory Johnson

cjohnson@thestreet.com