A Feb. 24 story,

Qwest Dons Collar for MCI, mistakenly reported that

Qwest

(Q:NYSE) had boosted the cash portion of its cash-and-stock offer for

MCI

(MCIP:Nasdaq). In fact, Qwest's offer accelerated the cash dividend payments in the proposed transaction but left the total value of the cash component the same.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected Feb. 25)

A Feb. 24 story,

Krispy Kreme Says U.S. Attorney Joins Probe, in reporting on

Krispy Kreme's

(KKD:NYSE) earnings restatement due to franchise accounting issues, erroneously stated that

Starbucks

(SBUX:Nasdaq) and a group of other companies were making similar restatements. Those other companies' restatements actually are related to lease accounting issues.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected Feb. 24)

A Feb. 18 story,

Router Round Goes to Juniper, erroneously reported that

Cisco's

(CSCO:Nasdaq) big-router market share was 62.4% at the end of September. Cisco's actual market share for that period was 56.9%.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected Feb. 18)

A Feb. 16 story,

Synopsys Swings to a Loss, erroneously reported that the Thomson First Call consensus earnings expectation for the company's second quarter was 17 cents a share. In fact, analysts were calling for 9 cents a share.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected Feb. 16)

A Feb. 14 story,

Awaiting Alan, Shares Stall, erroneously stated that volume on the

New York Stock Exchange

was the lowest in a year. In fact, volume was the lowest of any day this year.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected Feb. 15)

A Feb. 10 story,

Novatel Hits Reduced Targets, erroneously reported the result of the company's year-ago fourth quarter. It was a loss, not a profit, of $2.1 million.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected Feb. 11)

Due to an editing error, a Feb. 9 column by James J. Cramer,

Merck, JDSU Should Follow Lead of H-P, mistakenly indicated Cramer was long

JDS Uniphase

(JDSU:Nasdaq) at the time of publication. He did not have a long position in JDS Uniphase when the column was published.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected Feb. 9)

A Feb. 10 column by James J. Cramer,

Activision CEO's Sales Raise Only Ire, stated that

Activision

(AVTI:Nasdaq) CEO Robert Kotick had appeared on

CNBC's

"Squawk Box" the morning of Wednesday, Feb. 9. Kotick in fact made his appearance on Tuesday, Feb. 8.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected Feb. 10)

A Feb. 8 story,

Profit Climbs at Computer Sciences, incorrectly stated that

Computer Sciences'

(CSC:NYSE) third-quarter revenue fell short of Wall Street estimates. In fact, the company's revenue from continuing and discontinued operations of $3.99 billion topped the Thomson First Call consensus estimate of $3.96 billion.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected Feb. 9)

A Feb. 7 story,

Cendant Profit Up 30%, mistakenly reported that

Cendant's

(CD:NYSE) fourth-quarter net income rose 30% from a year earlier. The company's net income rose 24%.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected Feb. 8)

A Dec. 20 story,

Casinos Run The Table, transposed price-target changes made by Merrill Lynch analyst David Anders in December. The story reported that Anders raised his target on

Harrah's Entertainment

(HET:NYSE) to $83 from $72, and raised his target on

MGM Mirage

(MGG:NYSE) to $80 from $65. In fact, Anders raised his Harrah's target to $80 from $65 and his MGM Mirage target to $83 from $72.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected Feb. 8)

)

A Feb. 2 column by Richard Rhodes,

BellSouth Needs to Join Telecom Tango, did not disclose Rhodes' long position in

MCI

(MCIP:Nasdaq). At the time of publication, Rhodes was long MCI.

TheStreet.com

regrets the error.

(Corrected Feb. 2)

A Feb. 1 column by James J. Cramer,

An Exquisite Moment Could Be at Hand, should have made clear that the market data given were for the

S&P 500

index, not the

Dow Jones Industrial Average

. In January 2003, the S&P showed a monthly decline of 2.74%; it then proceeded to rally 29.94% for the year. In January 2005, the S&P showed a decline for the month of 2.47%.

TheStreet.com

regrets any confusion.

(Corrected Feb. 2)