Earlier this year, in a Barron's interview, legendary investor Jim Rogers said, "The 21st century is going to be the century of China." When asked about investment opportunities in China, Rogers replied, "Perhaps the safest investment is the renminbi, the Chinese currency."

Around the same time,

GE

(GE) - Get Report

announced plans to invest up to $2 billion in China via acquisitions and other deals over the course of the next three years.

So how much do you need to know about investing in China -- today?

The following are several current investment angles on China from

TheStreet.com

.

From

Asian Stocks End Higher on China Stimulus

:Asian stocks closed higher Monday

Nov. 10, stocks in Europe rose and stock futures in the U.S. were higher after the Chinese government announced a $586 billion (4 trillion yuan) stimulus package aimed at helping the country weather the global financial and economic crisis.

The CSI index in China finished 7.4% higher after the Chinese government unveiled a package designed to boost domestic demand amid signs China's export-driven economy is starting to feel the effects of the global slowdown.

Read the full version of

Asian Stocks End Higher on China Stimulus

.

From

Don't Count on China

:

While the Chinese economy may be still growing, it needs to grow at something like 6% a year just to absorb new entrants into the workforce, as the move from the countryside to the city is massive. The U.S. doesn't export that much to China, so the biggest effect for us could be rising interest rates, as our financing needs will need more attractive terms to entice buyers.

Read the full version of

Don't Count on China

(

RealMoney

access required).

From

China's Plan Will Have Limited Effect on U.S.

:

News of China's massive economic stimulus plan has helped markets worldwide, but for the U.S. the impact will be reduced by a number of important factors. For starters, China must of course finance its plan, which could mean it will have to either sell its holdings of U.S. Treasury and agency securities or slow its rate of accumulation in these securities (China holds about $1 trillion of U.S. securities).

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This will be necessary if China's budget surplus continues to shrink and if China's accumulation of foreign-exchange reserves slows, as it surely will as a result of the global economic slowdown.

Read the full version of

China's Plan Will Have Limited Effect on U.S.

(

RealMoney

access required).

From

China Watch: U.S. Firms Shelling Out

(Video, Nov. 10):

Research Manager Dave Peltier explains why huge U.S. firms are pouring cash into China despite the slowing global economy and how investors can play the trend.

Peltier: "These companies are flush with cash and they need to invest it somewhere... China not only has the built-in population, but it's a population that's becoming more affluent. So especially for a company like

Pepsi

(PEP) - Get Report

to go in there, I think it's great. And not to mention, you have a lot less currency risk because the currency is pegged or flat... If things thing deteriorate even more in the U.S., I think you may see a little bit of pullback from going overseas. But again, for the companies that are focused on growth... those companies will always be looking overseas."

To watch the video, click the player below:

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Related:

Pepsi to Invest $1 Billion in China

.

Plus, don't miss these China-focused videos on

TheStreet.com TV

:

China Watch Mail Bag: Foreign Shopping

(Nov. 8: One viewer asks whether recent overseas M&A activity by Chinese enterprises means they're not paying attention to what's happening back home.) and

China Watch: U.S. Too Cheap to Ignore

(Nov. 7: Sham Gad, managing partner of Gad Partners Fund, says he's focused on cheap U.S. stocks. His favorite way to play China now: oil.).

From

Kusick on A-Power and Solar, Wind Investing

:

In managing the

Breakout Stocks

model portfolio, one of our favorite names in the alternative energy space is a small Chinese company,

A-Power Energy Generation Systems

( APWR)

Shares of A-Power suffered mightily as investors fled small alternative energy names at the end of the summer -- a move exacerbated by the panicked selling that marked the worst October in recent stock market history.

Still, we've remained very excited about the long-term potential in this name, based on its attractive position to benefit from the Chinese government's plan to invest in wind power over the next decade.

Read the full version of

Kusick on A-Power and Solar, Wind Investing

.

From

China Watch: New Oriental Aces It

(Video, Nov. 3)

Louis Hsieh, CFO of

New Oriental Education & Technology

(EDU) - Get Report

, sheds some light on the company's great first-quarter results and forecast, and why it's insulated from the U.S. credit crisis.

Hsieh: "We're very pleased with our fourth quarter results. Revenue growth 47%... Also,

student enrollments were up 24% year over year... I think we will continue to grow in this business because of the strong demand for Chinese students and their families for supplemental education services... Chinese parents basically pay the bill for their children's education. We are not financed by any bank... and Chinese families are very good savers and income in China has

been rising at a very rapid rate... Parents will put education ahead of everything else in their lives as a top priority for their children... We do have competition, but no large competitors... We have 30,000 fierce little competitors."

To watch the video, click the player below:

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From

China Watch Mail Bag: Where's Gushan Going?

(Video, Nov. 1):

James Altucher answers the many viewers who've asked for insight on

Gushan Environmental Energy

( GU) in light of lower commodity prices and new policy in China.

Altucher: "Even if this stock didn't have all the fundamentals going for it in terms of China's regulatory policy and so on, we're talking about a $3 stock that has over $2 a share in cash, so most of the market cap is just in cash in the bank, and they have no debt... They're going to earn between 90 cents and a dollar in 2008 and they're going to earn a $1.50 in 2009."

Watch the video on TheStreet.com TV.

Plus, don't miss these China-focused videos on

TheStreet.com TV

:

China Watch: Boeing, UPS Bet on China Recovery (Oct. 31)

China Watch: Raking It in With Rural Reform (Oct. 29)

China Watch: Internet Picks That Aren't BIDU (Oct. 27)

From

Can China's Economy Stay Strong?

According to six economics and finance experts based in Hong Kong and mainland China, the country's prospects are reasonably good. Exports to Western markets are declining, but fast-growing Asian countries are taking up some of the slack. Wages are rising, boosting domestic spending and improving quality of life, while rising production costs are helping to eliminate polluting, low-value-added factories -- a process that is encouraged by Beijing.

And unlike in America and parts of Europe, China's banks are in good shape, largely because the government has prevented them from lending aggressively. Domestic consumption and investment are also showing robust growth. In addition, the government has some powerful tools that it can use to support the economy. As a result, say analysts, GDP growth in China will probably cruise along at 9% to 10% for the next couple of years. That may be lower than the previous 12% growth, but it is still a high rate for such a giant economy.

"There is no doubt the economy is growing more slowly, but we are not looking at a doom and gloom situation," says Terrace Chum, senior portfolio manager at MFC Global in Hong Kong.

Nonetheless, the U.S. credit crisis and the ongoing slowdown in Europe are likely to have some effect on China. "Our view, even at the beginning of the crisis, was that China would be resilient, but there is no such thing as decoupling, because the world is so integrated," says an investment banker based in Hong Kong. "That resilience, as we get further along in this crisis, will be increasingly tested. Even though countries like China are going to continue to hold up relatively well, and most of our economies in the region should avoid a recession, it is still going to be painful."

Read the full version of

Can China's Economy Stay Strong?

From

All About China's Overseas M&A Push

:

With an initial endowment of $200 billion, CIC China's sovereign wealth fund

China Investment Corporation

is China's most visible institutional financial investor; however, there are other important entities that have also made significant foreign investments. One of these is SAFE (State Administration of Foreign Exchange), which manages China's $1.8 trillion in foreign exchange reserves. For a long time, SAFE invested mainly in U.S. Treasuries; however, it has recently begun to diversify its holdings, partly over concerns that a falling dollar reduces the purchasing power of its U.S. Treasury holdings. In the first half of 2008, SAFE invested $2.0 billion for a 1% stake in

BP

(BP) - Get Report

, acquired a $2.8 billion (1.6%) stake in French oil giant

Total

(TOT) - Get Report

, and invested $2.5 billion in U.S. private equity firm

Texas Pacific Group

(TPG).

"Chinese firms are in an interesting situation," notes Bethel of ChinaVest. "Their increasing wealth means they can afford to make acquisitions, but oftentimes Chinese buyers are regarded with suspicion. After a series of high-profile, failed attempts (including

CNOOC's

(CEO) - Get Report

failed

Unocal

bid in 2005

Chevron

(CVX) - Get Report

ultimately acquired Unocal), many of China's state-owned giants have been cautious about being too visible in bidding for American firms. Instead, they are on an acquisition spree in places like Latin America and Africa where there are abundant natural resources and where building roads, bridges and schools helps foster political goodwill."

But while Chinese firms are aggressive in emerging markets, they seek to maintain a low profile in the developed world.

Read the full version of

All About China's Overseas M&A Push

.

To stay up to date on China and other emerging markets, visit

TheStreet.com's

Playing Emerging Markets page

.

This article was written by a staff member of TheStreet.com.