This column was originally published on RealMoney on June 14 at 10:58 a.m. EDT. It's being republished as a bonus for TheStreet.com readers. For more information about subscribing to RealMoney, please click here.

Five-dollar and ten-dollar stocks don't trade like

Coke

(KO) - Get Report

or

Pepsi

(PEP) - Get Report

.

There. Now I have explained a mystery that continues to confound newer investors.

I have been adamant that speculation should be a part of your daily investing regimen. I want you to get involved and I want you to stay involved, and that means having fun and having some excitement with 20% of your portfolio.

So, when I mention a stock like a

Rite Aid

(RAD) - Get Report

or a

Dynegy

(DYN)

or a

Level 3

(LVLT)

, I mean them to be in that part of the portfolio as the specs that can keep you in the game and make you some big money.

I mention all of these because they are now stalled. They are all digesting stock issuance or merger issues. They all have supply out there. Supply can weigh heavily on a stock, particularly with a Dynegy, where

Chevron

(CVX) - Get Report

just dumped 96 million shares on the market at $9.70. That's a real stench.

What to do? I think that this behavior is typical of stocks that have had big moves,

even as the enterprise values are increasing

.

This pattern exists with all comeback stocks that have had big moves. You have to accept it. When they back off, you have to buy more unless something has changed.

I changed my opinion on

Qwest

(Q)

and

Blockbuster

(BBI) - Get Report

after big runs because of changes at the top. I have not changed my views of Level 3, Dynegy or Rite Aid because I have

no reason

to do so. Everything I want to have happen -- the Eckerd deal, broadband shortage, power plant shortage -- is happening or playing out.

I don't know what to do other than stay the course when the fundamentals are working.

I hope that helps. I don't want to handhold on spec stocks, but I need to do that on these. I accept the responsibility, but I also think that people who own these should not be relying on me from here. They should be doing the work on the fundies themselves. If they can't, ring the register and find something you can tolerate.

Random musings:

It's a different world, a younger world. Go watch

my series of videos with Cliff Mason introducing his

new column. It is so heretical that I shudder. But I was an icon-smasher 20 years ago. Now I am an icon; I need to be smashed, too. ...

Goldman Sachs

(GS) - Get Report

, the June 230 puts are being sold furiously. That's going to push the stock back to $230, where I believe it will settle. ... Why do people continue to doubt

Saks

(SKS)

?!? They are just plain silly and do no work.

At the time of publication, Cramer was long Goldman Sachs.

Jim Cramer is a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. He contributes daily market commentary for TheStreet.com's sites and serves as an adviser to the company's CEO. Outside contributing columnists for TheStreet.com and RealMoney.com, including Cramer, may, from time to time, write about stocks in which they have a position. In such cases, appropriate disclosure is made. To see his personal portfolio and find out what trades Cramer will make before he makes them, sign up for

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