This column was originally published on RealMoney on April 18 at 8:48 a.m. EDT. It's being republished as a bonus for TheStreet.com readers. For more information about subscribing to RealMoney, please click here.

At the beginning of the year I was predicting big double-digit gains for the

Dow Jones Industrial Average

in my annual forecast, a forecast that quickly got me re-branded as a ridiculous optimist.

Now I'm looking real right.

Should have been even more bullish. Take a look; there are no holes in this index. When the worst you get is a not-great number from

IBM

(IBM) - Get Report

, you know you are off to the races.

Coke

(KO) - Get Report

had its best quarter in a decade and will go to $60 at this pace.

Johnson & Johnson

(JNJ) - Get Report

was supposed to be weak, but instead blows numbers away on drugs that we didn't even think were doing well.

JPMorgan Chase

(JPM) - Get Report

comes out with a magnificent number, arguably the best of the banks and a heavenly dividend boost.

McDonald's

(MCD) - Get Report

is reinvigorated with a growth that we would expect from a small-cap restaurant chain, better than that!

You have to think that after that beautiful

United Technologies

number, the stock is ready to break out to $70.

Citigroup

(C) - Get Report

came in with its first upside surprise in ages, and the stock is on the move.

Alcoa's

(AA) - Get Report

the best Dow stock so far and it's not done. It won't be independent next year at this time -- that's my forecast and I'm sticking to it.

Intel

(INTC) - Get Report

looked good;

AMD's

(AMD) - Get Report

losing share so I am not worried about that one.

Only

General Electric

(GE) - Get Report

and IBM didn't do better than I was hoping, and both were upside surprises of a sort.

I think the best is yet to come, there's more great Dow ink. I believe these companies will vastly exceed the numbers:

Yep, shoulda been even more bullish.

General Electric owns CNBC, for which Cramer is a featured commentator. At the time of publication, Cramer was long AIG and Hewlett-Packard.

Jim Cramer is a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. He contributes daily market commentary for TheStreet.com's sites and serves as an adviser to the company's CEO. Outside contributing columnists for TheStreet.com and RealMoney.com, including Cramer, may, from time to time, write about stocks in which they have a position. In such cases, appropriate disclosure is made. To see his personal portfolio and find out what trades Cramer will make before he makes them, sign up for

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