This column was originally published on RealMoney on May 18 at 1:40 p.m. EDT. It's being republished as a bonus for TheStreet.com readers. For more information about subscribing to RealMoney, please click here.

Sure, the

aQuantive

(AQNT)

deal is nutty. Sure, it's an overpay. Sure, it makes

Microsoft

(MSFT) - Get Microsoft Corporation (MSFT) Report

look stupid.

But Microsoft needed to do something. It needed to shut everyone else out. What we don't know is how much

anyone else

was willing to pay. And we don't know how desperate Microsoft is to leapfrog on the Web, where it seems to fall behind by the day.

What's baffling, of course, is that aQuantive is a company that was just a simple roll-up of cats and dogs that no one wanted for a very long time. I can actually remember chatting with these companies when I started

TheStreet.com

and marveling how overvalued they were originally. Then they went to nothing.

Then they went to $6 billion.

(I think Anthony Noto at Goldman is right, that now Microsoft can buy

Yahoo!

(YHOO)

and own it all except for

Google

(GOOG) - Get Alphabet Inc. Class C Report

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! If it can pay $6 billion for aQuantive, it will pay $50 billion for Yahoo!.)

I would love to tell you this is all nuts, but this ad space has gotten so unbelievably hot that I bet there was someone willing to pay $4 billion or $5 billion out there.

And Microsoft had cash.

No one laughed at Rupert Murdoch's $60 bid for

Dow Jones

(DJ)

. He needs to make something happen for

Fox Business

.

Microsoft needed to make something happen for MSN.

So it overpaid. Period, end of story.

Oh, and I am just glad we

nailed it!

At the time of publication, Cramer was long Goldman Sachs, Yahoo! and TheStreet.com.

Jim Cramer is a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. He contributes daily market commentary for TheStreet.com's sites and serves as an adviser to the company's CEO. Outside contributing columnists for TheStreet.com and RealMoney.com, including Cramer, may, from time to time, write about stocks in which they have a position. In such cases, appropriate disclosure is made. To see his personal portfolio and find out what trades Cramer will make before he makes them, sign up for

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