Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports

Plenty of young athletes enter their respective leagues with major hype that they're the best to come around in a long time, but don't quite live up to it. This is not something that could be said of Sidney Crosby.

When Crosby was about to be drafted, he was the most revered prospect the NHL had seen in years. Since he entered the league, Crosby has racked up awards, won championships and etched his name into hockey's history books. Just 32 years old and coming off a 100-point season, he doesn't look to stop anytime soon.

As Crosby prepares to enter his 15th year in the NHL, he is one of the best to play the game, and that has netted him quite a bit of money. How much is the hockey superstar worth?

Sidney Crosby's Net Worth

Sidney Crosby has been estimated as being worth approximately $55 million, according to Celebrity Net Worth. Crosby has been playing hockey and making millions from it for a long time. The only reason he didn't make this year's highest-paid NHL players list is that younger players have signed more recent contracts, netting them sizable signing bonuses. Crosby signed his last mammoth contract extension back in 2012, and still has several years left on it.

Sidney Crosby's Career

Crosby was known in the world of hockey before he stepped foot on the ice in an NHL game. As a teenager, his family moved him from their home of Nova Scotia to Minnesota, to play in Shattuck-Saint Mary's Boarding School's renowned hockey program. After dominating the competition there, he returned to Canada to play in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League. As in high school, he dominated the competition here as well, leading the league in points scored both years he played.

Still not yet 18 and dominating at every level, Crosby declared for the NHL draft as the finest prospect the league had seen in years.

Sidney Crosby and the Penguins

The Pittsburgh Penguins were the lucky victors of the lottery prior to the 2005 NHL draft, thus giving them the opportunity to draft Sidney Crosby with the first overall pick. To no one's surprise, they did just that.

While some NHL draft picks don't join their team for one or more years, Crosby signed his rookie deal not long after being drafted and was on the ice for Pittsburgh's first game of the 2005-06 season. The Penguins lost their first nine games on the season, but Crosby scored 11 points in those games. When they finally won in their 10th game, Crosby added two more points to his tally in the form of two assists.

All in all, Crosby had a fantastic rookie season to start his career. He came in second place in voting for the Calder Trophy, and in other years likely would have won it handily. But this season had two all-time greats in their first NHL season, and Alexander Ovechkin beat him out for the trophy. Still, Crosby appeared in 81 games on the year and finished in the top 10 in points (102, sixth in the league) thanks to his 63 assists, the seventh most in hockey. The Penguins had to be a pretty bad team to win the lottery to draft him, and remained terrible during his rookie season.

But with Crosby as their centerpiece, the Penguins improved soon after - as did Crosby. From his first to second season, Crosby went from good young player to already one of the elites of the NHL. He led the league in points during 2006-07 with 120, six more than San Jose's Joe Thornton. He was also second in the league with 84 assists. In a win against the Flyers in late October, Crosby got his first ever hat trick in the NHL. On the heels of this masterful season from Crosby, not only did he win his first-ever Hart Memorial Trophy, but the Penguins made the playoffs for the first time since 2001. They fell in the first round to the Senators. Though Crosby had a goal in each of the first three games, he was held scoreless in the final two as Pittsburgh lost the series in five.

In just two seasons, Crosby had changed the culture of the Penguins and brought them back to the playoffs. As of this writing, they haven't missed the playoffs since.

In the 2007 offseason, the Penguins resigned Crosby to a 5-year contract extension worth $43.5 million. The team had developed so well that they made the playoffs in 2008 despite Crosby only playing 53 games due to a midseason ankle sprain. Crosby returned toward the end of the season to give the Penguins a much healthier team for their playoff run. They exacted revenge in the first round by sweeping the Senators, then defeating the Rangers and Flyers in five games apiece to make their first Stanley Cup appearance in 16 years. Crosby was impressive throughout these playoffs, particularly in a 4-assist game against Ottawa. The Penguins lost to the Red Wings in six games in the Stanley Cup, but Crosby scored six points in the last four games to try and keep his team alive.

Back to full health for 2008-09, Crosby once again scored over 100 points, and got his second ever hat trick in a game against the Devils. The Penguins fought some particularly tough teams in the Eastern Conference, but made it through due in part to Crosby's great play: eight points in a 6-game series with the Flyers, 11 points in a 7-game series with the Capitals (including a hat trick in Game 2) and seven points in a 4-game sweep of the Hurricanes. In a Stanley Cup rematch with the Red Wings, Crosby scored just three points. But a team effort saw the Penguins take down Detroit in seven games for Crosby's first-ever Stanley Cup championship.

Following up his championship year, Crosby achieved a new first in 2009-10: leading the league in scoring, tied with Steven Stamkos of the Lightning with 51 goals. With his fourth 100-point season in his first five years under his belt, the Penguins advanced to the playoffs once again. Crosby had 14 points in the opening series with the Senators. But he was held scoreless in the decisive game six, and scored just five points in a 7-game series against the Canadiens that Montreal ended up winning.

The 2010-11 season looked to be yet another great one for Crosby; through 41 games, he had 66 points divided almost evenly between goals (32) and assists (34). But some big hits in the last couple of games took a devastating toll on Crosby, who suffered a concussion. His post-concussive symptoms led to him missing the remainder of the season, including a 7-game playoff series against the Lightning that the Penguins lost.

Crosby had hoped to make a full recovery for the 2011-12 season, but missed the start of the season. He returned in November and December for eight games, scoring 12 points, but the lingering effects of his concussion came back and he made the decision to step away until he felt fully comfortable playing again. He returned again in March to play 14 more games and enter the playoffs with his team. Despite a comeback effort in games four and five, Pittsburgh was ousted in the first round by the Flyers.

After the end of the 2012 season, it was announced that Crosby was signing a massive contract extension with the Penguins: $104.4 million over 12 years.

Crosby's 2012-13 was shortened, both due to the NHL lockout of 2011 and a broken jaw he sustained in late March. Despite this, he scored 56 points in 36 games and came in second in voting for the Hart Trophy behind Ovechkin. Crosby missed the first game of the playoffs but returned after that, scoring nine points in the last five games of a series win over the Islanders. He added six points in a 5-game series win over the Senators, which included a hat trick in the second game. But the Penguins were absolutely dominated in the Eastern Conference Finals by the Bruins; Crosby didn't have a single point the entire series, and Boston swept Pittsburgh.

2013-14 saw Crosby play 80 games for the first time since the 2009-10 season, surpassing 100 points for the first time since then as well. He led the league with 104 points and 68 assists. Led by Crosby, who won the Hart Trophy for the second time in his career, the Penguins were a dominant team. They defeated the Blue Jackets in six games in the first round of the playoffs, but all six of Crosby's points in the series were assists, meaning he had done two consecutive playoff series without a goal. He finally scored one in the next round against the Rangers, but after winning three of the first four games, the Rangers won the last three to stun the Penguins and advance. The collapse led to the firing of Pittsburgh's coach and general manager.

The following season was another great one for Crosby, as he scored 84 points. But the team limped into the playoffs and fared poorly, as they faced the New York Rangers again and were handily defeated in five games. Crosby had four points in the series, including two goals in the team's lone win.

Crosby and the Penguins started off slowly in 2015-16. He didn't score a single point in the team's first five games, and after three points in game six went scoreless in the next three. But the team eventually caught fire, and Crosby threw himself into MVP consideration as the playoffs neared. In the first round, he scored eight points in five games as this time the Penguins defeated the Rangers. The team then defeated the Capitals in six games, but Crosby scored just two points, neither of which were goals. But Crosby was crucial in the Conference Finals against the Lightning, with game-winning goals in multiple games as the Penguins forced a game six and game seven to make the Stanley Cup for the first time since 2009.

Though Crosby did not score a goal in the 2016 Stanley Cup, he had four crucial assists against the Sharks, including two in the decisive sixth game that won the Penguins the Stanley Cup. Crosby was awarded his first ever Conn Symthe Trophy for his play in the playoffs.

The 2016-17 Penguins did not get off to a slow start, and neither did Crosby. He finished the regular season as the league's leading goal-scorer and once again came in second for the Hart Trophy. The Penguins cruised to the playoffs once again. He would score seven points in a 5-game series over the Blue Jackets. Though he missed one game in the next series against the Capitals with a concussion, the team won in seven games to advance to the Conference Finals. Thanks in part to one goal each in games three, four and five and an assist in game seven from Crosby, the Penguins advanced to their second consecutive Stanley Cup Finals, this time to face the Predators. Crosby scored just one goal, in a game four loss, but his seven overall points were crucial to the team winning their second consecutive  Stanley Cup in 6 games. Once again, Crosby was named the recipient of the Conn Symthe.

Crosby had an unusual first in his career for the 2017-18: playing in all 82 games of the regular season. Like the year prior, he scored 89 points and led his team to the playoffs. Opening the playoffs against the Flyers, Crosby achieved yet another playoff hat trick in game one. He'd score 11 points in total as they defeated Philly in six games. He'd follow that up with eight points against the Capitals, but the Penguins were eliminated during Washington's miracle run to the Stanley Cup.

2018-19 saw Crosby score 100 points for the first time since the 2013-14 season, and come in second for the Hart Trophy for the third time in four years. But in the playoffs, the Islanders made quick work of the Penguins with a sweep. Crosby scored just one point, an assist in game four.

Sidney Crosby's Contract: How Much Does He Make?

Crosby remains in the middle of the 12-year contract extension he signed back in the 2012 offseason. Currently, he is signed through the 2024-25 season, which would be his 20th season in the NHL.

According to Spotrac, he will be making a $9 million salary for the 2019-20 season. By the close of the season, that would give him career cash earnings of approximately $128.29 million. Should he play out the entirety of his contract, it would put that figure at $155.89 million.

Sidney Crosby's Endorsements

As one of, if not the most recognizable players in the NHL for the past two decades, Crosby has raked in his fair share of endorsements.

Crosby's most notable endorsement deal is with Adidas, (ADDYY) who he signed with back in 2015. But the hockey star has also had other deals with Tim Hortons, Gatorade, CCM and more.

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