Jim Cramer: Approach Markets Cautiously As Single-Day COVID Deaths Cross 4,000

In Friday's market breakdown, Jim Cramer and Katherine Ross talk bitcoin, COVID, Boeing, Roku, Tesla, President Trump and more.
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The jobs report on Friday was disappointing as the U.S. lost 140,000 jobs in December, falling far short of economist's expectations of the addition of 50,000 jobs. The unemployment rate held steady at 6.7%.

And there's more news coming out of D.C. 

Late Thursday night, President Donald Trump returned to Twitter with a video that came as close to a concession as we’ve seen from the President, who vowed for a peaceful transition to a new administration without naming President-elect Biden. 

Jim Cramer, however, was more focused on the coronavirus as U.S. crossed yet another grim milestone Thursday. Deaths attributed to the virus surpassed 4,000, marking a single day record, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. 

"You can’t have 4,000 deaths from COVID without some sense that there will be some sort of lockdown when the new president comes in," Cramer said. 

Noting the potential for a lockdown certainly puts the Federal Reserve in a position, Cramer said investors should approach markets with caution. 

“It’s a moment unlike any other moment I’ve seen," Cramer said. 

In Friday's market breakdown Jim Cramer talks Boeing  (BA) - Get Report, CVS  (CVS) - Get Report, Tesla  (TSLA) - Get Report, Roku  (ROKU) - Get Report, Micron  (MICR) - Get Report, bitcoin and more: 

U.S. Capitol Police confirmed Thursday that an officer had died. Officer Brian Sicknick died due to injuries sustained at the riots at the Capitol. A statement released by the Police stated, "Officer Sicknick was responding to the riots on Wednesday, January 6, 2021, at the U.S. Capitol and was injured while physically engaging with [rioters]. He returned to his division office and collapsed.” 

And in stock-related news, Boeing  (BA) - Get Report is paying a charge of $2.5 billion to the Department of Justice linked to the fraud and conspiracy charges which were linked to the 737 MAX program. 

Boeing said the settlement involves a criminal penalty of $243.6 million, based on the conduct of two former MAX program technical pilots, and set up a $500 million fund to provide compensation for families of the victims of the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines accidents. Boeing said around $1.77 billion has already been set aside for costs related to settlement and will be used to compensate its customers for the losses linked which are linked to the 737 MAX's grounding.

"I firmly believe that entering into this resolution is the right thing for us to do—a step that appropriately acknowledges how we fell short of our values and expectations," said CEO Dave Calhoun. "This resolution is a serious reminder to all of us of how critical our obligation of transparency to regulators is, and the consequences that our company can face if any one of us falls short of those expectations." 

Discussing the impact to Boeing's stock, Cramer said, "I think it is the final chapter."

"They [Boeing] need orders. If they get orders, the stock really rockets," Cramer said. 

Curious about what Jim Cramer and his team at Action Alerts PLUS are watching in the markets? Watch Cramer's exclusive members-only Daily Rundown show on Action Alerts PLUS following TheStreet Live.

Daniel Kuhn contributed reporting to this article.