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Morning Bell With Jim Cramer: Boston Beer and Square

Jim Cramer talks stock market news, including the latest with Boston Beer and Square.

Stocks were mixed Thursday after the Federal Reserve indicated that it would tighten monetary policy earlier than previously expected.

TheStreet founder Jim Cramer shares his thoughts with Katherine Ross about Boston Beer  (SAM) - Get Report and and the credit card payments provider Square  (SQ) - Get Report.

Boston Beer: Buy or Sell?

Cramer discussed Citi analyst Wendy Nicholson's note on Boston Beer, where she cut her price target to $1,145 from $1,395 while keeping a neutral rating.

Nicholson said that she was concerned about a slow-down in Nielsen data.

Jim Cramer Says Boston Beer Should Consider a Stock Split

She also believes investors expected Boston Beer's launch of Truly Tea and Truly Punch to help offset tough comps "to a more significant degree than they apparently have."

"That's a tough call," Cramer said. "This stock trades on the Nielsen's and the note- and a very good analyst - indicate that the Nielsen's have peaked. And there's charts in the note that tell you absolutely that it's peaked."

Cramer said that while the stock has come down a little, "If I owned Boston Beer, I would sell it."

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Square: Buy or Sell?

Cramer discussed how big banks, such as JPMorgan Chase  (JPM) - Get Report, are struggling to compete with upstarts like Square.  

JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon recently said the bank "didn't have the imagination" to think up offering loans to small businesses based on their daily receipt volumes," wrote TheStreet's Scott Rutt in his "Mad Money" recap.

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Cramer said the big banks are really caught "because they're in a regulatory web."

"They have many different organizations that regulate them and that's not what Square has," Cramer said. "Square can do whatever it wants because Square is a tech company. I think Jamie is kind of fed-up because he's hamstrung and they're not."

However, Cramer said Dimon "could've set a lot of this up."

"I think what the real issue is that he didn't listen to the customer," he said. "And that's what he should be upset about. He's not listening to the customer. It's what the customer wanted."