Click here for an archive of Cramer's "Mad Money" recaps.

Investors should set aside negative economic news and concerns about overvalued stocks and just concentrate on buying stocks and making money, Jim Cramer told viewers of his "Mad Money" TV show Wednesday.

Right now there is one problem facing investors: "they are overthinking this stock market," he said.

The market is not working the way the professionals think it should and thus the people who know more about investing are making less and the people who know less are making more, he said.

"There is a huge wall of money rolling at us courtesy of the

Fed

and it doesn't pay to over think it," Cramer said. "In fact it pays to not to over-think it." When money comes in, it drives stocks higher and that's all people should be looking at.

Oil is driving everyone crazy because people are in shock that this commodity has gone up as much as it has and that no new oil is coming out of the ground, he said. However, "don't worry about high oil prices."

Also, even though alternative energy stocks may seem overvalued, they are still going higher, as are the infrastructure, fertilizer and China plays, Cramer continued. He believes betting against something that's overvalued is a bad idea in this environment.

Market players should be buying things even though they are overvalued, Cramer advised. Although this may seem irresponsible, traditional market thinking is not going to get people anywhere right now.

Stop trying to be smarter than the market and over thinking it, he said. Instead recognize that oil, tech, fertilizer, alternative energy are all bull markets.

"Go buy some

Google

(GOOG) - Get Report

and

Baidu

(BIDU) - Get Report

," Cramer said. "Welcome to rate cut."

Raven Maven

Baltimore Ravens defensive tackle Justin Bannan joined Cramer on his show, where the NFL star asked Cramer what he should be looking out for and concerned about when investing in the market.

Given the amount of time he devotes to playing football, Cramer said he couldn't imagine Bannan would have a lot of time to spend on stocks. Instead, he suggested the player consider putting 10% of his money in a gold fund or gold itself, 20% of his money in international plays and 30% in mutual funds.

When Cramer asked Bannan why he had such a large position in bonds, Bannan replied the bonds have made him some good money so far.

Cramer said that someone at Bannan's age, with 20 years ahead of him, should consider moving more money into the equity market or overseas market. "Maybe pick one or two stocks, businesses that you like" and follow up on them, he advised. Bannan agreed that it wouldn't be a bad idea to invest in one or two.

Sticking With Nastech

A little speculation is good for portfolios, as long as people recognize the risk, do their homework and are careful buying the stock, Cramer told viewers. "But what happens when your stock drops the ball?"

Nastech Pharmaceutical

( NSTK) is one of those "yet-to-become-profitable biotechs with the ability to make you boatloads of cash if it gets it right," he said. Its edge is supposed to be its proprietary nasal system for the treatment of osteoporosis.

Moreover, it has a "virtual mosaic of drugs" in development for various diseases, Cramer added. Nastech has drugs in the works for obesity, diabetes and autism, as well as osteoporosis

Although it missed its earnings "horribly" recently, it's important to realize stocks like Nastech don't trade based on their earnings, he explained. They trade based on their drug pipeline.

Cramer said he's not ready to give up on Nastech yet. However, if people are going to stay in the stock after this miss, they have to make sure their thesis is right.

What a Crocs

On a separate note, "we had some tricks an some treats today," Cramer said. While market players got some treats with

Google

(GOOG) - Get Report

, they got a trick with

Crocs

(CROX) - Get Report

.

"I'm now saying I'm done with Crocs," he said. "I didn't like the quarter."

Am I Diversified?

During the "Am I Diversified?" game, Cramer's first player called out the following five stocks:

Dow Chemical

(DOW) - Get Report

,

General Mills

(GIS) - Get Report

,

General Motors

(GM) - Get Report

,

Coca-Cola

(KO) - Get Report

and

Weingarten Realty Investors

(WRI) - Get Report

.

Cramer called out a pair in GIS and KO and advised the caller to sell GIS and pick up a defense contractor instead. He also said it wouldn't be so bad to sell Dow either because it's not doing so well.

The second caller asked if he was diversified with these five holdings:

Apple

(AAPL) - Get Report

,

ValueClick

(VCLK)

,

Cisco Systems

(CSCO) - Get Report

,

Level 3 Communications

(LVLT)

and

Caterpillar

(CAT) - Get Report

, the last of which Cramer owns for his charitable trust,

Action Alerts PLUS.

Cramer told the caller he had too tech exposure with Apple, ValueClick and Cisco. Even though he likes them all, he said he can't recommend owning them all in a single portfolio.

The last caller named these five:

Diana Shipping

(DSX) - Get Report

,

Terra

( TRA),

Mosaic

(MOS) - Get Report

,

NovaGold Resources

(NG) - Get Report

and

Altair Nanotechnologies

(ALTI)

.

Cramer told the caller he had too many speculative and fertilizer plays. He suggested getting rid of some and picking up some "plain vanilla" companies.

Image placeholder title

Lightning Round

Cramer was bullish on

Core Labs

(CLB) - Get Report

,

FMC

(FMC) - Get Report

,

Oceaneering International

(OII) - Get Report

,

Apache

(APA) - Get Report

,

XTO Energy

( XTO),

Ciena

(CIEN) - Get Report

,

Reliance Steel

(RS) - Get Report

,

AK Steel

(AKS) - Get Report

,

United States Steel

(X) - Get Report

,

Brookfield Asset Management

(BAM) - Get Report

and

Yum! Brands

(YUM) - Get Report

.

Cramer was bearish on

Concho Resources

(CXO) - Get Report

,

Axsys Technologies

( AXYS) and

Schnitzer Steel Industries

(SCHN) - Get Report

.

Want more Cramer? Check out Jim's rules and commandments for investing from his latest book by

clicking here

.

For more of Cramer's insights during the Lightning Round, click here

.

At the time of publication, Cramer was long XTO Energy.

Jim Cramer, host of the CNBC television program "Mad Money," is a Markets Commentator for TheStreet.com, Inc., and CNBC, and a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. All opinions expressed by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are his own and do not reflect the opinions of TheStreet.com or its affiliates, or CNBC, NBC UNIVERSAL or their parent company or affiliates. Mr. Cramer's opinions are based upon information he considers to be reliable, but neither TheStreet.com, nor CNBC, nor either of their affiliates and/or subsidiaries warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Mr. Cramer's statements are based on his opinions at the time statements are made, and are subject to change without notice. No part of Mr. Cramer's compensation from CNBC or TheStreet.com is related to the specific opinions expressed by him on "Mad Money."

None of the information contained in "Mad Money" constitutes a recommendation by Mr. Cramer, TheStreet.com or CNBC that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction, or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. You must make your own independent decisions regarding any security, portfolio of securities, transaction, or investment strategy mentioned on the program. Mr. Cramer's past results are not necessarily indicative of future performance. Neither Mr. Cramer, nor TheStreet.com, nor CNBC guarantees any specific outcome or profit, and you should be aware of the real risk of loss in following any strategy or investments discussed on the program. The strategy or investments discussed may fluctuate in price or value and you may get back less than you invested. Before acting on any information contained in the program, you should consider whether it is suitable for your particular circumstances and strongly consider seeking advice from your own financial or investment adviser.

Some of the stocks mentioned by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are held in Mr. Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio. When that is the case, appropriate disclosure is made on the program and in the "Mad Money" recap available on TheStreet.com. The Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio contains all of Mr. Cramer's personal investments in publicly-traded equity securities only, and does not include any mutual fund holdings or other institutionally managed assets, private equity investments, or his holdings in TheStreet.com, Inc. Since March 2005, the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio has been held by a Trust, the realized profits from which have been pledged to charity. Mr. Cramer retains full investment discretion with respect to all securities contained in the Trust. Mr. Cramer is subject to certain trading restrictions, and must hold all securities in the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio for at least one month, and is not permitted to buy or sell any security he has spoken about on television or on his radio program for five days following the broadcast.