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It's time for

Yahoo!

(YHOO)

to buy

The Knot

(KNOT)

, "the premiere wedding Internet site," Jim Cramer told viewers of his "Mad Money" TV show Thursday.

In an effort to "resuscitate" Yahoo!, which he owns for his

Action Alerts PLUS charitable trust, Cramer has been looking at companies Yahoo! could purchase to improve its growth.

Acquiring other companies is the only way Yahoo! is going to "come back from the dead," he said.

On

Wednesday's show, Cramer suggested

Bankrate

(RATE)

, and Knot is the next company he believes Yahoo! and market players should buy.

TheStreet Recommends

"Buy Knot before Yahoo! does," Cramer said.

The Knot, the most trafficked wedding destination on the Web, is going up whether Yahoo! buys it or not, he said.

There are two obstacles that might stand in the way of a Yahoo!-Knot marriage. The first impediment would be if Yahoo!'s management decides not to do anything to improve its company. And the second would be cold feet that The Knot's gotten too expensive. Cramer, however, doesn't agree with that thinking.

"Yahoo! should buy Knot, but even if it doesn't, I would still get behind this stock and ride out its growth and momentum," he said.

On another note, Cramer told viewers if they bought

Google

(GOOG) - Get Alphabet Inc. Class C Report

on his recommendation, they should be up "a sweet 35 points."

Image placeholder title

And it's still not too late to get into it, Cramer said, as he is raising his price target for Google from $500 to $560 a share.

Healthy Dialing

While

Johnson & Johnson

(JNJ) - Get Johnson & Johnson Report

shares, another holding in Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS, did nothing after the health care company

reported earnings results Monday, shares rallied 4 points after its conference call.

This is because "conference calls matter," Cramer said. "So far, Johnson & Johnson has given the best conference call of this reporting season."

It convinced people to buy, he went on to say.

Most major companies hold conference calls soon after they report where anyone can call in, Cramer explained. It is here where the chief executive talks about what went right and what mattered to the company during the past quarter of year.

While people can't trade off how the company did in the past, conference calls also provide forecasts and open up the call for questions, he said.

The first thing Cramer said he listens for in a conference call is confidence in management.

"If they are sheepish with the questioning, then I would throw the company out immediately," he said. "And if they are upbeat in the face of weak results, then that company is not for me either."

Johnson & Johnson, which has a "historically reserved" management, sounded confident, said Cramer, and that made him feel "great." In the question-and-answer session, management answered every question clearly.

The next thing Cramer listens for is guidance. If a company cuts guidance, it's most likely time to cut and run from the stock, he said. In this case, Johnson & Johnson gave "the best kind of guidance," he said. "It reported a better-than-expected quarter and then guided higher."

Also look for outliers, or any little pieces of information that might affect the company and stock, Cramer advised. The last thing he generally looks for during a conference call is how the management deals with the bears.

"Here's where Johnson & Johnson really shined," Cramer said. They promptly talked about their "troubled device makers" and "cut out the bears' tongues" with their candidness, he said.

Wrasslin' with Numbers

Cramer welcomed

World Wrestling Entertainment

(WWE) - Get World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. Class A Report

Chairman and CEO Vincent McMahon to the show and asked him about the company's audience.

"National attendance is a little bit down, but international attendance is huge," McMahon responded.

"The WWE is about the American culture without having the American political influences to go with it," he went on to say. "It's pretty easily understood, and it's global in nature."

When Cramer asked how the WWE protects itself from the downside of moviemaking, McMahon said that his company's movie-making model is different compared to the Hollywood model.

"We keep production costs down, and we use our own intellectual property," he said. "We have a tremendous leg up, and we are story tellers."

Cramer said that, with a 5% yield, he would be a buyer of WWE.

"The stock has been in business for seven years and has not moved, but that's about to change," Cramer said.

To view Cramer's interview with Vince McMahon, please click here.

Sell Block

In the show's "Sell Block" segment, Cramer said it's time to ring the register on

Santarus

(SNTS)

, which has run up on a new

drug licensing deal with

Schering-Plough

( SGP).

It's also time to ring the register on

C.R. Bard

undefined

and

Lear

(LEA) - Get Lear Corporation Report

, which are both up, he advised.

It's time to take

Level 3 Communications

(LVLT)

, a stock that's up 25% since Cramer recommended it, off the table, he said. Cramer advised taking a little off of

Continental Airlines

(CAL) - Get Caleres, Inc. Report

as well, since this stock is up, too.

Apple

(AAPL) - Get Apple Inc. Report

and Johnson & Johnson, however, he advised holding. And, because Cramer believes

Walter Industries

(WLT)

could still go higher, he told viewers to hold on to shares of that name as well.

He suggested holding

Advanced Micro Devices

(AMD) - Get Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Report

, even though it had a bad quarter and advised getting rid of

Jefferies

(JEF) - Get Jefferies Financial Group Inc. Report

and going with

Knight Capital

(NITE)

.

Cramer said he was wrong to stay negative on

eBay

(EBAY) - Get eBay Inc. Report

and admitted he screwed up on

UnitedHealth Group

(UNH) - Get UnitedHealth Group Incorporated Report

, a stock he owns for Action Alerts PLUS, but said it's too cheap to sell now.

Lightning Round

Cramer was bullish on

Ford

(F) - Get Ford Motor Company Report

,

Senomyx

(SNMX)

,

TD Ameritrade

(AMTD) - Get TD Ameritrade Holding Corporation Report

,

E*Trade

(ET) - Get Energy Transfer, L.P. Report

,

FLIR Systems

(FLIR) - Get FLIR Systems, Inc. Report

,

NICE Systems

(NICE) - Get NICE Ltd. (Israel) Report

,

Procter & Gamble

(PG) - Get Procter & Gamble Company Report

,

MasterCard

(MA) - Get Mastercard Incorporated Class A Report

,

Trump Entertainment

( TRMP),

GameStop

(GME) - Get GameStop Corp. Class A Report

,

United Technologies

(UTX) - Get n.a. Report

,

EuroZinc Mining

(EZM) - Get WisdomTree U.S. MidCap Fund Report

,

Southern Copper

( PCU),

Pharmaceutical Product Development

( PPDI),

Tempur Pedic

(TPX) - Get Tempur Sealy International Inc Report

and

AU Optronics

(AUO)

.

Cramer was bearish on

Unilever

(UL) - Get Unilever Plc Report

.

For more of Cramer's insights during the most recent Lightning Round,

click here.

Want more Cramer? Check out Jim's rules and commandments for investing from his latest book by

clicking here

.

At the time of publication, Cramer was long Johnson & Johnson, Schering-Plough, UnitedHealth Group and Yahoo!.

Jim Cramer, host of the CNBC television program "Mad Money," is a Markets Commentator for TheStreet.com, Inc., and CNBC, and a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. All opinions expressed by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are his own and do not reflect the opinions of TheStreet.com or its affiliates, or CNBC, NBC UNIVERSAL or their parent company or affiliates. Mr. Cramer's opinions are based upon information he considers to be reliable, but neither TheStreet.com, nor CNBC, nor either of their affiliates and/or subsidiaries warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Mr. Cramer's statements are based on his opinions at the time statements are made, and are subject to change without notice. No part of Mr. Cramer's compensation from CNBC or TheStreet.com is related to the specific opinions expressed by him on "Mad Money."

None of the information contained in "Mad Money" constitutes a recommendation by Mr. Cramer, TheStreet.com or CNBC that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction, or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. You must make your own independent decisions regarding any security, portfolio of securities, transaction, or investment strategy mentioned on the program. Mr. Cramer's past results are not necessarily indicative of future performance. Neither Mr. Cramer, nor TheStreet.com, nor CNBC guarantees any specific outcome or profit, and you should be aware of the real risk of loss in following any strategy or investments discussed on the program. The strategy or investments discussed may fluctuate in price or value and you may get back less than you invested. Before acting on any information contained in the program, you should consider whether it is suitable for your particular circumstances and strongly consider seeking advice from your own financial or investment adviser.

Some of the stocks mentioned by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are held in Mr. Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio. When that is the case, appropriate disclosure is made on the program and in the "Mad Money" recap available on TheStreet.com. The Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio contains all of Mr. Cramer's personal investments in publicly-traded equity securities only, and does not include any mutual fund holdings or other institutionally managed assets, private equity investments, or his holdings in TheStreet.com, Inc. Since March 2005, the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio has been held by a Trust, the realized profits from which have been pledged to charity. Mr. Cramer retains full investment discretion with respect to all securities contained in the Trust. Mr. Cramer is subject to certain trading restrictions, and must hold all securities in the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio for at least one month, and is not permitted to buy or sell any security he has spoken about on television or on his radio program for five days following the broadcast.