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"We need to get America moving again," Jim Cramer told viewers of his "Mad Money" TV show Friday. He had a simple message for the Federal Reserve: "We need another rate cut."

Cramer said the country is in the grips of some of the worst deflation he's ever seen, and it's imperative that the Fed cuts rates to save it. Deflation is all around us, he said. Oil and natural gas continues to plummet, along with just about every commodity out there. The retail sector, said Cramer, is also horrible. Worst of all, the housing market continues to sink, with homes still losing value by the minute.

Cramer said that while no one is talking about a Fed rate cut yet, they will be by next week. He said the Fed needs to step up and answer the call, and unlike last year, take swift and decisive action to stop the deflation.

Cramer: Commodities Are Still Sketchy

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Cramer also again called for an immediate end to the mortgage crisis, and urged the Treasury to bail out

Fannie Mae

( FNM) and

Freddie Mac

( FRE). The markets need this mess to finally be over, he said. "Save our homes."

Cramer told investors that their gameplan for next week should be to buy more of his recommended banks and brokers before the rest of the market wakes up to the possibility of a rate cut and before the mortgage crisis get solved.

Nat Semi Chief Speaks

Cramer talked with

National Semiconductor

(NSM)

Chairman and CEO Brian Halla and asked the tough question -- "What have you done for us lately?"

Halla explained that the semiconductor industry was driven by mainframes, PCs, the internet, and then cell phones. Today, he said, it's being driven by energy conservation, health care and security and surveillance. He said he still sees growth in all of these areas.

When asked about solar technology in particular, Halla said that National Semi is working on technology that bolts onto solar cells and can increase efficiency by as much as 20%. He called solar a very exciting area, as the technology is now just 6 times less efficient than its carbon-based competitors. "We're within striking distance," he said.

Cramer acknowledged that it's been a horrible year for the semis, part of a longer five-year slide for the industry. However, he noted, prices for these companies have not been this low in over five years. He said now might be the time to start looking into these companies, as they can't go much lower.

He called National Semi in particular a cheap stock, one without an immediate catalyst, but one worth considering.

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Have Some FUN

"Happier days have arrived for some companies," Cramer told viewers. In a market that's decidedly been no fun for many companies, Cramer recommended the stock of

Cedar Fair

(FUN) - Get Report

.

Cramer said his thesis for Cedar Fair is simple: Eighty percent of the people who visit the company's many theme parks arrive by car, and with gas prices continuing to fall, that means great things for Cedar Fair.

Cramer said Cedar Fair has been taking big hits recently, on fears of rising gas prices and a slowing economy. In reality however, the company's attendance is up 3% this year, with revenue up 2%. Given that the declines were mostly psychological and not based on the facts, Cramer now feels FUN is now ready to run.

Also on the list of positives for the company -- its 9.3% dividend yield, which Cramer called relatively safe, and its most recent award for "Best Amusement Park" for its Cedar Point property in Sandusky, Ohio.

Mad Mail

In the "Mad Mail" viewer feedback segment, Cramer told a viewer that he got it wrong with

Novo Nordisk

(NVO) - Get Report

and he's not a buyer of that company until it's releasing a timeframe for its new diabetes drug.

Cramer reiterated a buy on "new tech" company

Parker Hannifin

(PH) - Get Report

but said that exposure to coal will continue to hurt rival

McDermott

(MDR) - Get Report

.

Lightning Round

In the Lightning Round, Cramer was bullish on

Energy Transfer Partners

(ETP)

,

Lowes

(LOW) - Get Report

,

Atlas Energy Resources

( ATN),

Wachovia

(WB) - Get Report

,

Petroleo Brasileiro

(PBR) - Get Report

and

Equitable Resources

(EQT) - Get Report

.

Cramer was bearish on

Continental Resources

(CLR) - Get Report

,

Leggett & Platt

(LEG) - Get Report

,

BP

(BP) - Get Report

,

Ambac

( ABK),

Elan

(ELN)

,

Pitney Bowes

(PBI) - Get Report

and

Consol Energy

(CNX) - Get Report

.

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Want more Cramer? Check out Jim's rules and commandments for investing by

clicking here

.

Read more of Cramer's Mad Money Lightning Round insights

.

For "Mad Money" performance statistics and other links, check out Mad Money stats

At the time of publication, Cramer wasn't long any stocks in this story.

Jim Cramer, host of the CNBC television program "Mad Money," is a Markets Commentator for TheStreet.com, Inc., and CNBC, and a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. All opinions expressed by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are his own and do not reflect the opinions of TheStreet.com or its affiliates, or CNBC, NBC UNIVERSAL or their parent company or affiliates. Mr. Cramer's opinions are based upon information he considers to be reliable, but neither TheStreet.com, nor CNBC, nor either of their affiliates and/or subsidiaries warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Mr. Cramer's statements are based on his opinions at the time statements are made, and are subject to change without notice. No part of Mr. Cramer's compensation from CNBC or TheStreet.com is related to the specific opinions expressed by him on "Mad Money."

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