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"I think you should buy a stock that I believe will ... have a simply abysmal 2006," Jim Cramer told "Mad Money" viewers Friday, saying that he likes

Electronic Arts

(ERTS)

.

"I don't want to hear the naysayers because I know better," he said, criticizing the slew of bad press the company has gotten after it

reported earnings this week.

Cramer said the media can only say what has happened to Electronic Arts, which has been really bad. But the media cannot talk about what's going to happen, so block out "the inane prattle," he said.

He thinks that the company is done going down, and that it's a best-of-breed video-game maker.

"We are poised to capture the biggest video-game cycle in history," he said, citing the many new game consoles to come out over the next few months. "This cycle won't peak until 2008 or 2009," he said, "but this is a long-term investment."

And he thinks that Electronic Arts will reap the benefits of this growing cycle since it owns some of the best franchises around, namely

Harry Potter

,

Lord of the Rings

and

James Bond

. He added that the company's soon-to-be released

The Godfather

game could also be a huge hit.

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Cramer believes that now is the time to get in because soon it could be hard to buy Electronic Arts at all.

A caller wanted to know if there were any handheld plays on the video-game cycle, and Cramer said to take a look at

Marvell

(MRVL) - Get Report

.

A Legg Up on Tuition

If you're reading

USA Today

then take note of the article about the college tuition rule change that Congress just slipped into the latest tax law, Cramer told viewers.

Under the old prepaid tuition rule, families could pay tuition money to the state while their children were very young and lock in the current tuition prices, he said.

But Cramer said the old system had a problem, in that the more a family contributed to prepaid tuition, the less eligible it became for financial aid.

Now prepaid tuition plans will be treated like regular 529 college savings plans, and families won't lose out on financial aid benefits, he said, predicting this will make more people eager to take advantage of prepaid tuition.

Technically, the state could handle the money for this account, but it will likely hire an asset manager, Cramer said.

And the company he believes is best positioned to take this project on is

Legg Mason

(LM) - Get Report

.

Cramer said that the firm is untarnished, unlike the other mutual fund brokerages; and that it has two of the best money managers in the business: Richie Freeman and Bill Miller.

But the new tuition rule isn't the only reason to buy Legg Mason, he said, adding that the company is fundamentally good.

He said not to load up the boat. Instead, he said he would wait for a dip and then buy part of his position.

Reading Palm's Future

Cramer said that he should have made the call earlier, but that he recommends

Palm

(PALM)

.

He believes the stock will go higher because it is the best handheld play on the market.

BlackBerry maker

Research In Motion

(RIMM)

is having some legal problems, but is it really time to "discount them and get ready to jump into bed with Palm and their Treo?" asked Cramer. "Absolutely," he said.

The company used to be king of the PDA, but now the product to watch is its Treo smartphone, which Cramer said is a great example of digital convergence. This means that the Treo combines all of your gadgets in a single device, including high-speed Internet access, and it has easy-to-use touch screens.

He said that it is also best of breed, in part because it runs on Windows, unlike the old Treo or the BlackBerry.

This means users can download Microsoft Word documents, hook up to Outlook and download Excel charts all with ease, he said.

He said that the company is trying to expand outside of the enterprise market and into the consumer market and that the company's double-digit sales and earnings growth projections could be too low.

Mad Mail

From the "Mad Money" mailbag, a viewer wanted to know some good plays on Japan. Cramer recommended looking at

Matsushita

(MC) - Get Report

,

Kubota

(KUB)

,

Kyocera

(KYO)

and

Toyota

(TM) - Get Report

.

Another viewer wanted to know how Cramer could recommend

Blackboard

(BBBB)

, as he did on

Wednesday's show, when

Microsoft

(MSFT) - Get Report

makes a similar product.

Cramer reminded the viewer that Microsoft didn't beat

Yahoo!

(YHOO)

or

Google

(GOOG) - Get Report

, just as many of its other initiatives have lagged the competition.

Lightning Round

Cramer was bullish on:

Starwood Hotels

(HOT)

,

Cephalon

(CEPH)

,

Forest Oil

(FST)

,

Best Buy

(BBY) - Get Report

,

C.H. Robinson Worldwide

(CHRW) - Get Report

,

Amcol International

(ACO)

,

Sirius Satellite Radio

(SIRI) - Get Report

,

Diamond Offshore Drilling

(DO) - Get Report

,

Michaels Stores

(MIK) - Get Report

,

Henry Schein

(HSIC) - Get Report

,

Walgreen

(WAG)

and

Varian Medical

(VAR) - Get Report

.

Cramer was bearish on:

Pfizer

(PFE) - Get Report

,

Skyworks Solutions

(SWKS) - Get Report

,

Imax

(IMAX) - Get Report

and

USG

(USG)

.

For more of Cramer's insights during the Lightning Round,

click here.

Want more Cramer? Check out Jim's rules and commandments for investing from his latest book by

clicking here

.

At the time of publication, Cramer was long Cephalon, Microsoft and Yahoo!.

Jim Cramer, host of the CNBC television program "Mad Money," is a Markets Commentator for TheStreet.com, Inc., and CNBC, and a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. All opinions expressed by Mr. Cramer on Mad Money are his own and do not reflect the opinions of TheStreet.com or its affiliates, or CNBC, NBC UNIVERSAL or their parent company or affiliates. Mr. Cramer's opinions are based upon information he considers to be reliable, but neither TheStreet.com, nor CNBC, nor either of their affiliates and/or subsidiaries warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Mr. Cramer's statements are based on his opinions at the time statements are made, and are subject to change without notice. No part of Mr. Cramer's compensation from CNBC or TheStreet.com is related to the specific opinions expressed by him on "Mad Money."

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