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NEW YORK (

TheStreet

) -- "Pessimism at the government level beats good news at the corporate level ... at least for now," Jim Cramer told the viewers of his "Mad Money" TV show Wednesday. Cramer likened our recent market action to a chess game, where piece by piece, corporate news is getting overtaken by global issues.

Cramer said, based on all of the positive news spewing from companies, the markets should be higher, a lot higher, but with so many concerns about the global economy, good news doesn't seem to matter. He provided 10 examples to prove his point.

1.

John Deere

(DE) - Get Report

. Cramer said Deere gave a huge guidance boost today, but fears over its international business kept its share price down.

2.

Hewlett-Packard

(HPQ) - Get Report

. Cramer said H-P delivered a great number, but with business in Europe up in the air, its shares were also muted.

3.

Occidental Petroleum

(OXY) - Get Report

. This company also provided strong growth, but Cramer noted that hedge funds sell commodities when the dollar is strong, so no-go there as well.

4.

JPMorgan Chase

(JPM) - Get Report

. Cramer said this

Action Alerts PLUS name is poised to deliver monster earnings as well, but worries over financial regulations won't let its shares gain any momentum.

5.

Banco Santander

( STD). This bank is in talks to buy

M&T Bank

(MTB) - Get Report

, but since Santander is based in Spain, its stock is plummeting, possibly killing the deal.

Cramer's list continued with

Target

(TGT) - Get Report

,

Home Depot

(HD) - Get Report

, another Action Alerts Plus stock,

Northrop Grumman

(NOC) - Get Report

,

3M

(MMM) - Get Report

and the oil drillers... all of which have great stories to tell, but have been trumped by the bad news of the day.

"So what do we do," asked Cramer? "We wait." Cramer told investors to stay in touch with the fundamentals and wait for these governmental fears to pass. When they do, he said, all of this positive news will matter once again.

Securities and Exchange 'Omission'

Continuing his series to educate investors, Cramer warned that stocks are not cash, and shouldn't be treated as cash. Stocks, he said, can go down for many reasons, some of which have nothing to do with the company itself.

Cramer explained that in the old world, corporate earnings were everything. Stocks that had good earnings went up, and those that didn't went down. But today's market has turned that notion on its ear, said Cramer, and outside factors can now determine which way a stock moves.

Cramer said that with the repeal of the uptick rule by the Bush administration, short sellers have gained far too much power. Short sellers, he said, create fear and panic, and were partially to blame for the fall of Lehman Brothers and are a real threat in Germany currently.

Also a threat to the markets are double and triple short ETFs, said Cramer, which are nothing more than instruments for traders to beat down stocks needlessly. These ETFs can quickly overwhelm a stock, he said, which begs the question, "how can this be allowed to happen?"

Cramer said it's clear from last week's 1,000-point decline in the

Dow

, that the

Securities and Exchange Commission

is on the side of Wall Street, and not the average American. He called the SEC's proposed fixes for the problem are "profoundly misguided," noting that the proposed circuit breakers exclude ETFs, the exact people that need to be stopped.

"Who represents the people at the SEC," asked Cramer? Who protects the IRAs and the 401(k)s? Cramer said the SEC's actions simply make no sense. He said the agency is not equipped to protect the average investor from con men like Bernie Madoff, and their policies do nothing as well.

Growth and Safety: Health Care REIT

"In this market, we want safety," Cramer told viewers, as he once again recommended an accidentally high-yielding stock that offers both growth and safety for investors.

Cramer recommended

Health Care REIT

(HCN)

, a real estate investment trust that operates in 39 states and offers a juicy 6.6% yield.

Cramer said as America continues to age, the demand for health care will only continue to rise, translating into an increased need for medical properties, the exact kind that Health Care REIT offers. He said that unlike other REITs, which only own the mortgages to their properties, Health Care REIT actually owns their facilities, with only 7% of properties being currently mortgaged.

Cramer called Health Care REIT a best of breed player because of its diversification both by property type and geography. In addition to being in 39 states, the company is also split between skilled nursing facilities, senior living facilities, hospitals and medical office buildings.

Health Care REIT delivered an earnings beat of 2 cents a share on May 3, with revenues up 10%. Cramer said the company has a solid balance sheet and the possibility of raising its already high dividend. He advised buying a little now, and even more if the stock continues to fall.

Am I Diversified

Cramer played "Am I Diversified" with callers to see if their portfolios have what it takes. The first caller's portfolio included

Anadarko Petroleum

(APC) - Get Report

,

Boeing

(BA) - Get Report

,

General Mills

(GIS) - Get Report

,

Qwest

(Q)

and

Schlumberger

(SLB) - Get Report

.

Cramer identified two of a kind with Anadarko and Schlumberger. He recommended selling one and picking up a health care stock in its place.

The second caller's top holdings included

Citigroup

(C) - Get Report

,

Hot Topic

( HOTT),

Altria

(MO) - Get Report

,

Windstream

(WIN) - Get Report

and

Sprint

(S) - Get Report

.

Cramer said that both Sprint and Windstream are both telcos, and this portfolio needed an industrial company like

Caterpillar

(CAT) - Get Report

or

John Deere

(DE) - Get Report

.

The third caller had

Wal-Mart

(WMT) - Get Report

,

McDonalds

(MCD) - Get Report

,

Johnson & Johnson

(JNJ) - Get Report

,

Google

(GOOG) - Get Report

and

Apple

(AAPL) - Get Report

as their top five stocks.

Cramer said this portfolio has two tech companies, and one needs to go.

The fourth caller's top stocks were

Abbott Labs

(ABT) - Get Report

,

Altria

(MO) - Get Report

,

Apple

(AAPL) - Get Report

,

Ford

(F) - Get Report

and

Wells Fargo

(WFC) - Get Report

.

Cramer said this portfolio had perfect diversification.

Lightning Round

In the Lightning Round, Cramer was bullish on

Corning

(GLW) - Get Report

,

Dendreon

(DNDN)

,

Baidu.com

(BIDU) - Get Report

,

Yahoo!

(YHOO)

,

Lancaster Colony

(LANC) - Get Report

and

Bank of Montreal

(BMO) - Get Report

.

Cramer was bearish on

Universal Display Corp

(PANL) - Get Report

,

Google

(GOOG) - Get Report

and

Itau Unibanco

(ITUB) - Get Report

.

-- Written by Scott Rutt in Washington D.C.

To watch replays of Cramer's video segments, visit the Mad Moneypage on CNBC

.

Want more Cramer? Check out Jim's rules and commandments forinvesting from his latest book by

clicking here.

For more of Cramer's insights during the Lightning Round, clickhere

.

At the time of publication, Cramer was long JPMorgan Chase and Home Depot.

Jim Cramer, host of the CNBC television program "Mad Money," is a Markets Commentator for TheStreet.com, Inc., and CNBC, and a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. All opinions expressed by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are his own and do not reflect the opinions of TheStreet.com or its affiliates, or CNBC, NBC UNIVERSAL or their parent company or affiliates. Mr. Cramer's opinions are based upon information he considers to be reliable, but neither TheStreet.com, nor CNBC, nor either of their affiliates and/or subsidiaries warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Mr. Cramer's statements are based on his opinions at the time statements are made, and are subject to change without notice. No part of Mr. Cramer's compensation from CNBC or TheStreet.com is related to the specific opinions expressed by him on "Mad Money."

None of the information contained in "Mad Money" constitutes a recommendation by Mr. Cramer, TheStreet.com or CNBC that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction, or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. You must make your own independent decisions regarding any security, portfolio of securities, transaction, or investment strategy mentioned on the program. Mr. Cramer's past results are not necessarily indicative of future performance. Neither Mr. Cramer, nor TheStreet.com, nor CNBC guarantees any specific outcome or profit, and you should be aware of the real risk of loss in following any strategy or investments discussed on the program. The strategy or investments discussed may fluctuate in price or value and you may get back less than you invested. Before acting on any information contained in the program, you should consider whether it is suitable for your particular circumstances and strongly consider seeking advice from your own financial or investment adviser.

Some of the stocks mentioned by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are held in Mr. Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio. When that is the case, appropriate disclosure is made on the program and in the "Mad Money" recap available on TheStreet.com. The Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio contains all of Mr. Cramer's personal investments in publicly-traded equity securities only, and does not include any mutual fund holdings or other institutionally managed assets, private equity investments, or his holdings in TheStreet.com, Inc. Since March 2005, the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio has been held by a Trust, the realized profits from which have been pledged to charity. Mr. Cramer retains full investment discretion with respect to all securities contained in the Trust. Mr. Cramer is subject to certain trading restrictions, and must hold all securities in the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio for at least one month, and is not permitted to buy or sell any security he has spoken about on television or on his radio program for five days following the broadcast.