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We have a weak dollar, which is only getting weaker, but contrary to popular belief, this is not bad for the market, Jim Cramer told viewers of his "Mad Money" TV show Monday.

First of all, "the market" doesn't really exist, but is a convenient way to group together a bunch of disparate stocks, he explained. There are those companies that get hurt by a weak dollar and those that get rich by a weak dollar, Cramer said.

The only time people should worry about a weak dollar is when it leads to higher interest rates. But that's not going to happen here, he said.

The winning stocks that should profit from a weak dollar are those that have had "incredible" global success, because when these companies exchange their money back into dollars, they should get better exchange rates and thus more money, Cramer said.

The 14 American companies with the lowest percentage of sales in the U.S., he continued, include

Altria

(MO) - Get Report

and

Halliburton

(HAL) - Get Report

, both of which Cramer owns for his charitable trust,

Action Alerts PLUS.

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The 12 other companies are

Procter & Gamble

(PG) - Get Report

,

DuPont

(DD) - Get Report

,

IBM

(IBM) - Get Report

,

Chevron

(CVX) - Get Report

,

Dow Chemical

(DOW) - Get Report

,

Exxon Mobil

(XOM) - Get Report

,

Qualcomm

(QCOM) - Get Report

,

Aflac

(AFL) - Get Report

,

Analog Devices

(ADI) - Get Report

,

Colgate-Palmolive

(CL) - Get Report

,

Intel

(INTC) - Get Report

and

Texas Instruments

(TXN) - Get Report

.

However, not all of these stocks are worth buying, according to Cramer. For example, although a weak dollar may be good for Dow Chemical, this stock is an "underperformer" and not a good buy here.

Also, Chevron and Exxon are both "way too levered to oil," and are not worth buying here either, Cramer went on to say.

Similarly, the techs on the list are all "sensitive to consumer spending," and IBM "has already had its move," although Cramer said he would buy IBM on a pullback.

There are four stocks on the list he said he considers "winners" that are worth buying: Altria, Procter & Gamble, DuPont and "Prince Hal."

"These are the four horsemen of the weak dollar apocalypse," Cramer said. All these companies reported their last quarters without the weak dollar factored in, so they should have better-than-expected earnings, he explained.

Not only is Altria "dirt cheap," it is going to break itself up into three companies, which is when the company's "real value will be unlocked," Cramer said.

Moreover, Procter & Gamble's upside surprise should stem from exchange-rate fluctuations, and DuPont "is in a great moment with corporate nirvana where price increases are sticking and raw costs are going down."

Finally, Cramer believes that Halliburton won't have to cut its prices because the weak dollar should do it for the company.

"I'd buy any of these four," he said.

Red, Red Wine

For a few weeks now,

The New York Times

and

The Wall Street Journal

have been reporting about how it is a proven fact that red wine saves lives, Cramer told his viewers.

However, the newly found health benefits of red wine have done nothing to spur action in

Constellation Brands

(STZ) - Get Report

, the world's largest wine producer, Cramer said.

The market is giving investors a gift with Constellation Brands, and people should accept that gift, Cramer said. Although analysts may be painting a bleak picture for Constellation, he insisted there is no reason to be concerned about the stock.

Because wine companies are not allowed to tout the health benefits of their products, Constellation is one of those stocks that "floats under the radar," Cramer said. But now it should be able to blow away its numbers.

Constellation Brands is a good stock to own and should be poised to make a lot more money, "now that red wine is virtually a vitamin," he said.

Cramer told viewers to take a little

Chemical & Mining Co. of Chile

(SQM) - Get Report

off the table and pocket some profits but urged people to stay in the stock.

The company is in the middle of a bidding war and has become a battleground. And although Cramer usually advises people to stay away from battlegrounds, "this is one you should buy" because both bidders are backing up their trucks and loading up on Chemical's stock, he said.

Previously, Cramer said he liked Chemical for its lithium (nondrug) business, which is still a reason to buy this stock. But one of the main reasons he believes Chemical is a buy right now is because 54% of the company's business has to do with fertilizers.

Fertilizer is a growth market, he said. "It is the place to be."

Moreover, Chemical is "undervalued by 30% based on its earnings alone. And if it gets acquired, the premium should be a whole lot higher than that," Cramer said.

Mad Mail

In his "Mad Mail" segment, Cramer told a viewer that both

Hasbro

(HAS) - Get Report

and

Mattel

(MAT) - Get Report

are "incredibly cheap stocks."

Further, "all that ultimately matters is the inexpensive nature of a stock -- not whether it's overbought or oversold," he told the viewer.

Responding to his next piece of mail, Cramer said that

Packeteer

( PKTR) is not nearly as good a stock as

Riverbed Technology

(RVBD)

.

In Cramer's "Sudden Death" round, he was bearish on

Superior Industries

(SUP) - Get Report

,

American Standard

( ASD) and

Whole Foods

( WFMI).

Lightning Round

Cramer was bullish on

Devon Energy

(DVN) - Get Report

,

Halliburton

(HAL) - Get Report

,

Verizon

(VZ) - Get Report

,

Waste Management

( WMI),

Panera Bread

(PNRA)

,

Trump Entertainment

( TRMP),

Lundin Mining

( LMC),

Starbucks

(SBUX) - Get Report

,

Walter Industries

(WLT)

and

Level 3 Communications

(LVLT)

.

Cramer was bearish on

Helmerich & Payne

(HP) - Get Report

and

Alcoa

(AA) - Get Report

.

For more of Cramer's insights during the most recent Lightning Round,

click here.

Want more Cramer? Check out Jim's rules and commandments for investing from his popular book by

clicking here

.

At the time of publication, Cramer was long Altria and Halliburton.

Jim Cramer, host of the CNBC television program "Mad Money," is a Markets Commentator for TheStreet.com, Inc., and CNBC, and a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. All opinions expressed by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are his own and do not reflect the opinions of TheStreet.com or its affiliates, or CNBC, NBC UNIVERSAL or their parent company or affiliates. Mr. Cramer's opinions are based upon information he considers to be reliable, but neither TheStreet.com, nor CNBC, nor either of their affiliates and/or subsidiaries warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Mr. Cramer's statements are based on his opinions at the time statements are made, and are subject to change without notice. No part of Mr. Cramer's compensation from CNBC or TheStreet.com is related to the specific opinions expressed by him on "Mad Money."

None of the information contained in "Mad Money" constitutes a recommendation by Mr. Cramer, TheStreet.com or CNBC that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction, or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. You must make your own independent decisions regarding any security, portfolio of securities, transaction, or investment strategy mentioned on the program. Mr. Cramer's past results are not necessarily indicative of future performance. Neither Mr. Cramer, nor TheStreet.com, nor CNBC guarantees any specific outcome or profit, and you should be aware of the real risk of loss in following any strategy or investments discussed on the program. The strategy or investments discussed may fluctuate in price or value and you may get back less than you invested. Before acting on any information contained in the program, you should consider whether it is suitable for your particular circumstances and strongly consider seeking advice from your own financial or investment adviser.

Some of the stocks mentioned by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are held in Mr. Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio. When that is the case, appropriate disclosure is made on the program and in the "Mad Money" recap available on TheStreet.com. The Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio contains all of Mr. Cramer's personal investments in publicly-traded equity securities only, and does not include any mutual fund holdings or other institutionally managed assets, private equity investments, or his holdings in TheStreet.com, Inc. Since March 2005, the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio has been held by a Trust, the realized profits from which have been pledged to charity. Mr. Cramer retains full investment discretion with respect to all securities contained in the Trust. Mr. Cramer is subject to certain trading restrictions, and must hold all securities in the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio for at least one month, and is not permitted to buy or sell any security he has spoken about on television or on his radio program for five days following the broadcast.