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Wednesday's Small-Cap Winners & Losers

Hana Biosciences was among the big small-cap movers.

Small-stocks traded comfortably in the green Wednesday, amid leaping names like

Hana Biosciences

(HNAB)

.

The California-based biotech soared 27.9% after saying that Marqibo, its proposed treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, received fast track designation from the Food and Drug Administration for patients suffering a second relapse, or who have failed two lines of prior therapy. Marqibo has already been granted this status for first-line treatment. Shares were trading at $1.71.

Bally Technologies

(BYI)

, a Las Vegas-based maker of products for the commercial-gaming industry, was upped to sector outperform at CIBC World Markets on the heels of better-than-expected guidance for fiscal 2007 and 2008.

Bally said fiscal 2007 earnings should exceed 51 cents a share, with 2008 EPS expected to range between around $1.39 and $1.69 a share. Analysts polled by Thomson Financial are looking for 28 cents a share in fiscal 2007 and $1.01 in 2008.

Bally shares ballooned 19.4% in support of the Russell 2000, which was recently climbing 1.1% at 796.9. The S&P SmallCap 600 rose 1% to 418.4, despite a precipitous drop at

Tween Brands

(TWB)

TheStreet Recommends

.

The New Albany, Ohio-based girls' apparel retailer -- a member of both indices -- plunged 27.6% to $27.95 after

more than halving its fiscal second-quarter profit to $2.1 million, or 7 cents a share, vs. Wall Street's 15-cent per-share expectations. The company, which operates the Limited Too chain, also predicted far-lower-than-expected third-quarter earnings of 40 cents to 45 cents a share.

Abatix

(ABIX)

, a Dallas-based maker of personal-protection and safety equipment, also floundered after announcing it will voluntarily delist from the

Nasdaq

, citing burgeoning "costs and corporate-governance requirements associated with being a reporting company." Shares slid $2, or 23%, to $6.68.

And

SXC Health Solutions

(SXCI)

gave up 11.1% after a "competitor's protest" cost the Lisle, Ill.-based company a "notice of intent to award" for a $27.3 million contract with an unnamed entity. The health care information technology firm had first announced the possibility of this contract in June. Shares slid $2.15 to $17.15.