Tech stocks were trading in an out of flat levels Tuesday as investors digested a weak consumer confidence report and continued economic concerns against the backdrop of falling to three-month lows in stocks.

Cellphone maker

Nokia

(NOK) - Get Report

gained 47 cents, or 1.9%, to $24.90. The company said that it will acquire Symbian, the consortium that makes the operating system for its phones. Mobile devices based on Symbian OS account for 60% of the converged mobile device segment and the Symbian OS represented approximately 7% of all mobile device sales in 2007, up from 5% in 2006, said Nokia. Nokia will spend 264 million euros (approximately $411.5 million) to purchase the 52% of stake in Symbian that it does not already own.

Yahoo!

(YHOO)

was up 65 cents, or 3%, to $22.10 following speculation that the company's buyout talks with

Microsoft

(MSFT) - Get Report

may be back on. Another

report

suggested that Microsoft and Yahoo! may be willing to restart negotiations around the sale of the company's search engine business alone.

Oracle

(ORCL) - Get Report

added 30 cents, or 1.3%, to $22.38 ahead of the company's fourth-quarter earnings report. Analysts are expecting EPS of 44 cents on revenue of $6.86 billion, compared with EPS of 37 cents on revenue of $5.88 billion a year ago.

Shares of

ComScore

(SCOR) - Get Report

were down $5.72, or 20.7%, to $21.98 after

Google

(GOOG) - Get Report

introduced

a free media planning tool for advertisers called Ad Planner which gives ad buyers information about sites that their audience is most likely to visit.

Virgin Mobile

( VM) lost 45 cents, or 13%, to $3 after it said it will offer unlimited calling for $79.99 a month. The plan is lower than that rivals

AT&T

(T) - Get Report

and

Sprint's

(S) - Get Report

.

Shares of

Sonus Networks

(SONS)

fell 56 cents, or 13.6%, to $3.57 after the company said it is in talks with Legatum Capital, its largest shareholder, to help resolve the disputes between the two. Legatum Capital owns about 25% of Sonus and has raised questions about Sonus' performance, withholding its votes for directors standing for election to the company's board.