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General Electric (GE) - Get Free Report has shed the financials businesses of its GE Capital segment, and is no longer considered a systemically important financial institution. The iconic industrial company is a long-time component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average and has returned to the roots of its core businesses.

This metamorphosis has resulted in extreme share price volatility that appears on the daily, weekly and monthly charts below. These charts show that shares of General Electric have been very volatile over the past 52 weeks and over the last 20 years.

Analysts expect General Electric to earn 46 cents a share when the company reports quarterly results before the opening bell on Friday. GE has beaten estimates in each of the past two quarters. Most on Wall Street do not expect blowout numbers, which makes the charts even more important to track.

Jim Cramer of the Action Alerts PLUS portfolio discussed the stock in a message to subscribers on Friday. They expressed confidence in General Electric, which they own in the portfolio. They like GE's 3% dividend, they said, and "we believe management will continue to return value to shareholders ... the improving economy should be an underlying tailwind for the company's operations." Cramer have a $35 price target on the stock.

General Electric is a holding in Jim Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS Charitable Trust Portfolio. Want to be alerted before Cramer buys or sellsGE? Learn more now.

Here's the daily chart for General Electric.

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Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

General Electric closed Tuesday at $31.27, down 1% year to date. The stock is 15.4% above its Feb. 11 low of $27.10 and is 5.2% below its July 20 high of $33.

The daily chart shows the Fibonacci retracement levels of the rally from the Feb. 11 low to the July 20 high. The price gap lower on July 22 was caused by a negative reaction to earnings. The stock plunged below its 23.6% retracement of $31.61 on July 26. By Sept. 9, the stock was below its 38.2% retracement of $30.75, then below its 50% retracement of $30.05 on Sept. 13. Between Oct. 6 and Nov. 9, the stock was mostly below its 61.8% retracement of $29.36, with a low of $28.19 on Nov. 3. That followed a negative reaction to earnings released on Oct. 21.

Shares of General Electric participated in the post-election Trump bump. The stock closed at $29.55 on Nov. 8 and rebounded by 9.6%, moving above all retracement levels, trading as high as $32.38 on Dec. 20. Since then, the stock has been moving sideways to down going into Friday's earnings report.

Here's the weekly chart for General Electric.

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Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The weekly chart shows a red line through the price bars, marking the key weekly moving average (a five-week modified moving average). The green line is the 200-week simple moving average, the "reversion to the mean."

The study in red along the bottom of the chart is weekly momentum (a 12x3x3 weekly slow stochastic), which scales between 00.00 and 100.00, where readings above 80.00 indicate overbought and readings below 20.00 indicate oversold.

A negative weekly chart shows the stock below its key weekly moving average, with weekly momentum declining below 80.00 in a trend toward 20.00. A positive weekly chart shows the stock above its key weekly moving average, with weekly momentum rising above 20.00 in a trend toward 80.00.

The weekly chart for General Electric ended last week positive but overbought, but that will change given a negative reaction to earnings. The stock could end this week below its key weekly moving average of $31.29 if weekly momentum falls below the overbought threshold of 80.00. The reading is projected to decline to 81.15 this week, down from 83.28, so it won't take much downside to fall below 80.00.

Look at the 200-week simple moving average, now at $27.14. The last test of this "reversion to the mean" occurred during the week of the flash crash of Aug. 24, when the stock traded as low as $19.37. Note how the week of Aug. 28, 2015, sticks out as a sore thumb on the weekly chart.

Here's the monthly chart for General Electric.

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Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The monthly chart for General Electric shows the Fibonacci retracement levels of the decline from its all-time intraday high of $60.50, set in August 2000, to its March 2009 low of $5.73.

Note how shares of General Electric have been steadily rising since the March 2009 low. The stock traded around its 23.6% retracement of $18.65 between April 2010 and June 2012, before beginning the next leg up. The 38.2% retracement of $26.65 has been a magnet between November 2013 and November 2015, surviving the flash crash of Aug. 24, 2015. The latest leg of strength has failed at its 50% retracement of $33.11 in July 2016.

Investors looking to buy General Electric should consider buying weakness to $30.75, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of January. The $32.68 level will become a pivot or magnet for all of 2017, given a positive reaction to earnings. Investors looking to reduce holdings should consider selling strength to $33.36 and $35.71, which are key levels on technical charts until the end of March and June, respectively.

This article is commentary by an independent contributor. At the time of publication, the author held no positions in the stocks mentioned.