Updated from 2:47 p.m. EST

Auto sales at

DaimlerChrysler

(DCX)

ticked up in October, while

General Motors

(GM) - Get Report

and

Ford

(F) - Get Report

posted declines.

Daimler's sales rose 4.7% to 188,492 from 185,535. Sales from its Chrysler Group gained 2.3% to 170,169 units, while Mercedes-Benz sales slipped 4.9% to 18,323 vehicles from 19,273 last year. Year to date, Daimler's sales added 3% to 1.8 million.

Elsewhere, GM sold 346,058 vehicles for the month, down 4.7%. Sales of passenger trucks fell 4.3% to 210,996, and passenger car sales slipped 5.3% to 135,062. For the year, the Detroit automaker's sales were up 0.5% to 4 million from 3.9 million.

"GM's October sales results were not as strong as we had expected, but not entirely surprising given our exceptionally strong sales in September," GM said in a statement.

Ford said U.S. sales totaled 268,474 vehicles last month, down from last year's 282,468. That marks its fifth straight monthly sales decline. Passenger car sales fell 20% to 76,405, while sales of passenger trucks climbed 2.5% to 192,069. For the year, Ford's U.S. sales totaled 2.8 million, down 4.6% from a year earlier.

Burnham Securities analyst David Healy said industrywide monthly sales were stronger than expected, but he pointed out that most of the good news came from foreign automakers.

Nissan's

(NSANY)

sales in North America rose 27% in October, while

Honda's

(HMC) - Get Report

added 10% and

Toyota's

(TM) - Get Report

were up 13%.

"If you can get over a terrific month like September with only a minimum hangover like you did in October, I think it does point to the fact that there is some underlying strength in car sales," Healy said. "I think we are looking at a stronger second-half than we did first-half, and apparently gasoline prices have not impacted sales very much."