Pain of Lowering Bar in Tech Will Pay Off

Getting it over with now means we can party in the next phase of the gadget rally.
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This column was originally published on RealMoney on Jan. 20 at 11:03 a.m. EST. It's being republished as a bonus for TheStreet.com readers.

We are in the lowering-the-bar stage for tech, where the companies are making sure that the rest of the year will get beaten. That means pain before gain, but gain there will be.

I know that it is awful to sit here and hear about how tough 2006 is going to be in tech, but wouldn't you rather wrench all the expectations

now

and get it over with so we can party on down for the next phase of the gadget rally? Other than the guidedowns in PCs, I believe those related to the Web and broadband are more "lowered bar" than actuality.

In fact, I believe that the build that is coming, particularly the build for PlayStation and Nintendo, which is going to be huge in light of the demand for Xbox 360, could propel the

Nvidia

(NVDA) - Get Report

and

Marvell

(MRVL) - Get Report

faction of tech even higher than it has been.

Meanwhile, let the

Google

(GOOG) - Get Report

and

Apple

(AAPL) - Get Report

world cool for a bit, take in some

Yahoo!

(YHOO)

on the guidedown and get ready to buy some cell-phone stuff that has been brought down by set-top box worries at

Motorola

(MOT)

. I know, that sounds stupid even to write, but it is true -- it was set-top box weakness that caused

Motorola's problems, not handsets.

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At the time of publication, Cramer was long Yahoo! and Motorola.

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