MGM to Reopen More Vegas Hotels After ‘Strong Opening Weekend’

MGM Resorts is prepping to reopen more of its Las Vegas properties, including its Aria, Luxor, Mandalay Bay and Four Seasons resorts and casinos.
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MGM Resorts International  (MGM) - Get Report is prepping to reopen more of its Las Vegas properties in the coming weeks, including its Aria, Luxor, Mandalay Bay and Four Seasons resorts and casinos amid what executives described as a “strong opening weekend.”

In a statement, MGM said it was prepping to open the Luxor hotel as well as the Shoppes at Mandalay Bay Place on June 25 at 10 a.m. PT, followed by the Aria hotel at 10 a.m. It will open its Mandalay Bay and Four Seasons Las Vegas hotels at 11 a.m. PT on July 1.

"It was exciting and emotional to see the energy in Las Vegas last week as we welcomed back our employees and reopened our doors to guests for the first time in months," MGM acting CEO Bill Hornbuckle said in a statement.

The coronavirus-induced closures that kept Las Vegas and its hotels and casinos dark for more than two months formally ended at 12:01 a.m. PT last Thursday with the reopening of MGM’s Bellagio, New York-New York and MGM Grand and The Signature casinos.

Wynn Resorts  (WYNN) - Get Report, Las Vegas Sands  (LVS) - Get Report and Caesars Entertainment  (CZR) - Get Report also unlocked their doors last week.

It is not be the same Las Vegas that took the unprecedented step of shutting down in mid-March as the deadly coronavirus made its way to U.S. shores. Disinfected dice, hand sanitizer, face masks, limited numbers of players at tables and temperature checks at entrances will all be part of the new Vegas experience - as will virus tests for workers.

Indeed, all the reopenings come with stringent, state-mandated protocols to reduce the risk for Covid-19 exposure, including plexiglass to physically distance players from casino staff and one another.

To be sure, with much of its fortunes gambling on travel and tourism, Las Vegas has a long road to recovery ahead. The U.S. gaming capital hit its best-ever numbers this past January and February, when taxable casino winnings were at $1 billion each month and unemployment was at an all-time low of 3.6%.

As of May, the official jobless rate in Las Vegas was 16%.