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NEW YORK (

TheStreet

)--Stocks were weak across the board Tuesday and financials were no exception. The U.S. dollar, which has strengthened in recent days on European debt concerns, got a further boost Tuesday following violence on the Korean Peninsula.

The

Financial Select Sector SPDR

(XLF)

, a popular exchange traded fund that tracks financial stocks, fell 1.50% to $14.42 on lower-than-average volumes.

Volumes were lower than usual for most financial names, though

Janus Capital Group

(JNS)

saw a flurry of activity as the money management company disclosed Tuesday it had received a request for information in a broad probe of

insider trading

by federal authorities first reported Friday on

The Wall Street Journal

's website. Janus, which also sold off Monday, fell another 2.83% to $10.65 on Tuesday on more than twice the average daily volume for the stock.

Wellington Management

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and

SAC Capital

also received inquiries,

The Wall Street Journal

reported Tuesday.

Goldman Sachs

(GS)

which took a big hit Monday after it was named in the

Journal

report, was down again on Tuesday, though its 2.01% drop to $157.82 was slightly better than

Citigroup

(C)

, which fell 2.03% to $4.10, and

JPMorgan Chase

(JPM)

, which saw its stock fall 2.29% to $37.63.

Regions Financial

(RF)

stock was downgraded to junk status ( BB+/B from BBB-/A-3, with a negative outlook) by Standard & Poor's on Tuesday on concern that more loan losses may erode the firm's capital. Regions ended the day down 14 cents at $5.21.

As for other big banks,

Bank of America

(BAC)

lost 1.77% to close at $11.10, while

Morgan Stanley

(MS)

dropped 1.56% to $24.67.

Wells Fargo

(WFC)

which would seem to have the least to worry about among the big banks from either an insider trading crackdown or events outside the U.S., dropped a relatively modest 0.48% to finish the day at $26.82.

--

Written by Dan Freed in New York

.

Disclosure: TheStreet's editorial policy prohibits staff editors, reporters and analysts from holding positions in any individual stocks.