The Secret Is out: Janus Strategic Value's Holdings Revealed!

The fund's biggest sector bets include diversified manufacturers and oil companies.
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Investors have given

David Decker

billions to invest, but they've had to wait until now to find out where he put their money.

When the first shareholder report for Decker's

(JSVAX) - Get Report

Janus Strategic Value fund is mailed shortly, investors will discover a fund that looks neither like a conventional value fund nor like a typical Janus fund.

It does, however, resemble Decker's other fund,

(JASSX)

Janus Special Situations.

Let's go to the numbers: At the end of April, the top five industries in Strategic Value were diversified manufacturers (6.7%), oil companies (6.6%), medical products (5.4%), telephone concerns (5.1%), and aerospace and defense (4.2%). Other industries he's bullish on are cable television (4%), casino hotels (4%), and truck-part and equipment makers (3.9%).

In cable TV, his favorites are

Charter Communications

(CHTR) - Get Report

,

Le Groupe Videotron

, and No. 8 holding

Comcast Corp

(CMCSK)

. In the hotel group there's No. 10 holding

Park Place Entertainment

(PPE)

and

Station Casinos

(STN) - Get Report

. Among the truckers his top picks are

Lear Corp

(LEA) - Get Report

,

Delphi-Automotive

(DPH)

and

Federal-Mogul

(FMO) - Get Report

.

It might be more instructive to focus on his top 10 stock picks, since they represent more than 40% of the fund. (One quick note from the toot-your-own-horn department:

TSC

named 14 stocks Decker might be buying in a March 1

story and nine are in the fund -- three in the top 10.)

Investors have clamored to know what's in Janus Strategic Value since it rolled out at the end of February with more than $1 billion in a

boffo four-week subscription period. Now it has nearly $3 billion, or more than seven times the assets of the average U.S. stock fund, according to

Morningstar

.

Investors' fervor for the fund went up a notch when the fund, up 5.9% over the last three months, weathered the tech-led selloff

better than the Denver growth specialist's other funds and the S&P 500. But like many big fund companies, Janus is preternaturally

secretive about its funds' holdings.

The fund's holdings represent a broad range of stocks, which reflects Decker's flexible approach. Rather than focus strictly on common valuation yardsticks like

price-to-earnings ratios, he sifts the market looking for companies with a catalyst for growth that might look cheap by other measures, like stock price to cash flow.

That unique strategy has made the young fund stand out among its value peers so far. The average value fund's top sector is usually financial stocks, with a 21% weighting, according to Morningstar. But the group gets just a 9% weighting in Decker's fund with none in the top 10. His top pick in the sector is broker

Merrill Lynch

(MER)

(2.3%), followed by

American Express

(AXP) - Get Report

(1.9%).

In the report, Decker uses

Advanced Micro Devices

(AMD) - Get Report

as an example of how and why he's broken from the P/E-fixated members of the value crowd. The microprocessor maker, which has a hefty 63.8 P/E ratio, was far behind competitor

Intel

(INTC) - Get Report

, but a beefed up product line is helping the firm close the gap, Decker says. He bought the pricey stock and it has paid off, rising some 74% since tech stocks peaked on March 10. Over the same time period the tech-heavy

Nasdaq Composite

is down 21%.

Aside from not looking like other value funds, he's managed to avoid the high degree of stock

overlap present in most Janus stock funds. Only two of the Janus' firm-wide top-10 stock holdings,

Enron

(ENE)

and Comcast, are in his fund, according to

bigdough.com

, a Web site that tracks individual ownership.

Then again, Decker is cribbing some of his own notes. Fourteen of the top 25 stocks in his other fund, Special Situations, found their way into Strategic Value at the end of the first quarter. Apparently he's only taken his best ideas from that fund, which trails its younger brother by some eight percentage points over the past three months.