It didn't take long for the instigators of a failed palace

coup

to leave the realm of the king they tried to overthrow.

A few months after portfolio manager Tino Sellitto and a colleague pushed to have

Berger

oust its chief executive, Jack Thompson, Sellitto has given notice at the Denver growth shop and is bound for

Putnam

in Boston.

Sellitto, who starts the new job Sept. 11, manages the

(BEOOX)

Growth and Income and

(BEONX)

Growth funds and co-manages

(BESLX)

Berger Select . At Putnam, he'll be assigned to the large-cap growth area, with some portfolio management duties on three funds, a spokeswoman says.

There he'll rejoin former Berger analyst Rick Wynn, who left for Boston in May when Sellitto's fellow cabalist, Amy Selner, departed.

According to people familiar with the matter, Sellitto, 35, and Selner, 31, went to the board of then-parent

Kansas City Southern

, the railroad that spun off its financial units into

Stilwell Financial

earlier this month, to complain about Thompson's refusal to share power with them. Instead of giving the insurgents keys to the executive washroom, the board gave Selner a pink slip, sources say.

In late May, Berger, whose sister shop is fast-charging

Janus

, hired Jay Tracey, who was running

Oppenheimer's

(OENAX)

Enterprise fund. In Denver, Tracey succeeded Selner on the

(BEMGX)

Berger Mid Cap Growth and

(BESCX)

Berger Small Company Growth and became the house's first chief investment officer.

Sellitto amassed an impressive record over the last year. Berger's go-go growth mandate led to top-quartile performance in Growth and Growth & Income, and continues that trend this year. According to sources, it doesn't seem that Sellitto was told to hit the highway like Selner, but given the coup's failure, speculation was high that Sellitto's departure was the inevitable other shoe.

Tracey will replace Sellitto on the Growth fund and Steve Fossel will become interim portfolio manager on Growth & Income, says Thompson. Sellitto's portion of the Select fund will be divided among the other managers on the fund.

Vanguard Changes International Value Skippers

Vanguard is changing skippers on its struggling

(VTRIX) - Get Report

International Value fund.

Tom Hansberger, Ajit Dayal, Ronald Holt and Aureole L.W. Foong of new subadviser

Hansberger Global Investors

will take the reins on Monday, according to a company announcement Friday. Hansberger is the firm's chief executive and formerly ran a foreign investment house,

Templeton Worldwide

. His firm is based in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., with offices in Hong Kong, Moscow, Toronto and Bombay.

The new team replaces London-based

Phillips & Drew

, which had run the fund since April 1996 with little success. The fund's 6.6% three-year annualized return trails 76% of foreign stock funds and limps behind the S&P 500 by more than 10 percentage points, according to Morningstar. Manager Wilson Phillips' all-cap strategy focused on cheap European and Japanese stocks and didn't work out too well. That said, value investing --essentially, bargain hunting -- has been out of favor in recent years.

Hansberger has run

(HIEMX) - Get Report

Harris Insight Emerging Markets fund with a different team since its inception in October 1997, his longest current tenure on a fund, according to Morningstar. The fund, which typically invests in shakier markets than Vanguard International Value, lost 31.5% in 1998 and gained 64.1% last year. Both returns trailed its average emerging-markets peer, but so far this year, although the fund is down 11.6%, it's beating its bogey.

Vanguard International Value's new managers won't change its strategy and shareholders will receive a letter notifying them of the change soon, according to the company statement.

Alliance Technology Looks Overseas

One of the biggest tech funds around wants more leeway to invest overseas.

The $12.6 billion

(ALTFX) - Get Report

Alliance Technology fund's board of directors gave co-managers Peter Anastos and Gerald Malone clearance to invest 25% of the fund's assets in foreign stocks, according to a Thursday regulatory filing. Previously they could invest only 10% of the fund abroad.

The filing says the fund's strategy won't change and at the end of June only 7% of the fund was invested in foreign stocks, according to

Morningstar

.

Munder Closes In With @Vantage Trust Fund

Munder

is on track to launch its closed-end

Munder @Vantage Trust

, a closed-end stock fund that will focus on Net stocks and invest up to 40% of its assets in private or pre-IPO Net stocks. On Friday the Birmingham, Mich.-based firm updated its filings noting that the fund's offering period will close on Oct. 12 and that

Chase H&Q

will serve as the fund's distributor. The preliminary filing didn't note when the offering period will begin.

The intriguing fund is one of a growing number of closed-end funds designed to give modest investors access to private companies or venture capital investing, typically the domain of well-heeled investors.

TheStreet.com

previewed the

fund on May 12 and the

trend on July 19.

See Thursday's

Fund Moves, Manager Changes.

See Wednesday's

Fund Moves, Manager Changes .

See Tuesday's

Fund Moves, Manager Changes .

See Monday's

Fund Moves, Manager Changes .