Investors can trade "flight to safety" investments using these four exchange-traded funds. The 30-year U.S. Treasury bond yield is best traded using the 20+ Year Treasury Bond ETF (TLT) - Get Report . Gold bullion can be traded using the SPDR Gold Shares ETF (GLD) - Get Report . Investors seeking dividends can invest in utility stocks via the Utilities Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLU) - Get Report . Investors willing to risk chasing higher-yielding bonds can invest in the SPDR Barclays High Yield Bond ETF (JNK) - Get Report .

Here's how the underlying investments are preforming now.

The yield on the 30-year U.S. bond rose to a fresh 2016 high of 3.171% on Dec. 8, targeting 3.256%, which is the June 26, 2015, intraday high yield. Much of the recent rise is in anticipation that the Federal Reserve Open Market Committee will raise interest rates following the Dec. 14 meeting. It seems that a rise of more than 25 basis points is feasible now, between the election and inauguration. This means that bond investors should consider buying bonds at my weekly and semiannual value levels of 3.224% and 3.296%, respectively. Monday morning's high yield of 3.215% is at the low end of the yield buy area.

Comex gold futures traded as low as $1,152.5 the Troy ounce this morning, continuing the weakness signaled by a "death cross" confirmed on Nov. 21, when the 50-day simple moving average fell below the 200-day simple moving average, indicating that lower prices lie ahead. My semiannual value level is $957.39, with a weekly pivot of $1,178.41, and quarterly pivot of $1,215.7.

The Dow utility average traded as low as 616.19 on Nov. 14, then rebounded to as high as 657.53 on Nov. 29, failing between my pivots of 635.23 and 670.81, which remain magnets for the remainder of 2016. The utility average has been below a "death cross" since election day. The utility average is just below its 50-day simple moving average of 647.18.

The year-to-date gain for S&P 500 SPDR ETF (SPY) - Get Report jumped to 11.1% last week, up from 7.8% on Dec. 2. The "flight to safety" investments ended last week with the U.S. Treasury bond ETF down 2.6% year to date, as compared to being down 0.8% on Dec. 2. The gold ETF and the utility stocks ETF have year-to-date gains of 8.8% and 10.8%, respectively, vs. gains of 10.6% and 9%, respectively, on Dec. 2.

Here's how to trade these ETFs.

Investors can trade the U.S. Treasury 30-year bond like a stock using the 20+ Year Treasury Bond ETF, which is backed by a basket of U.S. Treasury bonds with maturities of 20 years to 30 years. As a stock-type investment, it never matures, and interest income is converted to periodic dividend payments.

Here's the weekly chart for the bond ETF.

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Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The weekly chart remains negative but oversold, with the bond ETF below its key weekly moving average of $124.28 and below its 200-week simple moving average of $120.18, with low of $117.28 on Dec. 8. The weekly momentum reading declined to 7.35 last week, down from 8.11 on Dec. 2, falling even deeper below the oversold threshold of 20.00.

Investors looking to buy the bond ETF should consider buying weakness to my weekly value level of $117.19. Investors looking to reduce holdings should do so on strength to $122.31, which is a key level until the end of 2016.

Investors can trade gold like a stock using the SPDR Gold Shares ETF, which is backed by gold bullion.

Here's the weekly chart for the gold ETF.

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Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The weekly chart remains negative but oversold, with the gold bullion ETF below its key weekly moving average of $116.21 and below its 200-week simple moving average of $121.15. The weekly momentum reading declined to 10.15 last week, down from 13.34 on Dec. 2, falling deeper below the oversold threshold of 20.00.

Investors looking to buy the gold ETF should consider buying weakness to $108.99, which is a key level on technical charts for this week. Investors looking to reduce holdings should consider doing so on strength to $115.64, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of 2016.

Investors seeking the safety of dividends can trade the utilities ETF, which is a basket of 28 utility stocks.

Here's the weekly chart for the utilities ETF.

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Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The weekly chart has been upgraded to positive, with the utilities ETF above its key weekly moving average of $47.54 and above its 200-week simple moving average as support at $43.43. The weekly momentum reading rose to 25.56 last week, up from 21.56 on Dec. 2.

Investors looking to buy the utilities ETF should do so on weakness to $46.79, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of this week. Investors looking to reduce holdings should consider selling strength to $48.89 and $51.19, which are key levels on technical charts until the end of 2016.

The SPDR Barclays High Yield Bond ETF is for investors betting that junk bond yields will tighten against U.S. Treasury securities. Remember that the performance of junk bonds correlates to the stock market, not to the bond market, hence the recent tightening of spreads. Be careful, as junk bonds are trying to stabilize within a bubble.

Here's the weekly chart for the junk bond ETF.

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Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The weekly chart is positive, with the junk bond ETF above its key weekly moving average of $36.11. As a sign of a continuing bubble, the ETF remains well below its 200-week simple moving average of $38.49. This ETF has been below this "reversion to the mean" since the week of Nov. 14, 2014, when the average was $40.08. The weekly momentum reading rose to 47.37 last week, up from 40.50 on Dec. 2.

Investors looking to buy the junk bond ETF should do so on weakness to $32.98, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of 2016. The $36.46 level, where it closed on Friday, remains a magnet until the end of the year. Investors looking to reduce holdings should do so on strength to $37.76, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of December.

This article is commentary by an independent contributor. At the time of publication, the author held no positions in the stocks mentioned.