This column was originally published on RealMoney on June 16 at 9:12 a.m. EDT. It's being republished as a bonus for TheStreet.com readers.

Feels like old home week.

Microsoft

(MSFT) - Get Report

in the news for Bill Gates' retirement. People wanting to call the bottom in

Intel

(INTC) - Get Report

in

The Wall Street Journal's

Heard on the Street column.

Oracle

(ORCL) - Get Report

announcing "stunning" earnings increases.

Dell

(DELL) - Get Report

talking the other day about getting its groove back. We've already seen article after article about

Cisco's

(CSCO) - Get Report

big comeback.

Yada, yada, yada.

I have to tell you, the amount of time and energy spent on these companies versus their prospects and growth is ridiculous.

I would much rather spend the time talking about the next generation of techies than about these guys.

Who should the media be focused on? How about the fast-growing companies, companies like

Network Appliance

(NTAP) - Get Report

and

Citrix

(CTXS) - Get Report

, or how about

Qualcomm

(QCOM) - Get Report

and

Palm

(PALM)

, companies that are really growing and really raising earnings and revenue rates? Everyone's so captured by the old that it's "Who needs the new?"

I could not believe how important everyone thinks it is that Bill Gates is stepping down two years from now, especially because Steve Ballmer's been running the company. I could not believe how more people weren't focused on the company's incredibly lackluster performance -- five-year lows, for heaven's sake.

I chalk it up as another sign that the media simply can't get you where you need to be as a good investor because much of the media is made up of people who could care less about investing and just regard the news as something to report, like baseball scores, without the analysis. They rely on guests to do the analyzing not because they

are

better but because they just don't

know

any better.

The more we focus on these old-line techs, the more it feels like what happened to

IBM

(IBM) - Get Report

in the last decade. We stopped caring about IBM as a stock long before the media stopped caring about IBM, the company.

Don't be snookered. Maybe there is a bottom in Intel, but if that's the case, I would sooner own

AMD

(AMD) - Get Report

, which has more momentum. You want software? I would give you Citrix and Network Appliance over Oracle and Microsoft any day. If you really need Dell, I say, "Go to

Apple

(AAPL) - Get Report

." And if networking is your game, I just can't help you.

For a video presentation from Cramer on how to approach the market after Thursday's big rally, click here.

At the time of publication, Cramer was long Microsoft, Network Appliance, Citrix Systems and Qualcomm.

Jim Cramer is a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. He contributes daily market commentary for TheStreet.com's sites and serves as an adviser to the company's CEO. Outside contributing columnists for TheStreet.com and RealMoney.com, including Cramer, may, from time to time, write about stocks in which they have a position. In such cases, appropriate disclosure is made. To see his personal portfolio and find out what trades Cramer will make before he makes them, sign up for

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