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Cyber Monday Cost Buyers 13.9% More This Year

Amid shipping delays and inventory shortages, the demand for certain popular products far outweighed what is available in warehouses and on store shelves.

In between inflation and smaller discounts, the average shopper spent 13.9% more on their Cyber Monday purchases than last year.

In total, Americans spent an average of $10.7 billion on Cyber Monday this year. According to the latest data from Adobe ( (ADBE) - Get Adobe Inc. Report), that number is down 1.4% from 2020. But the average cost of each individual shopping cart is higher: 19% for the season overall.

While this season saw many try to score Cyber Monday deals on bigger items like furniture, the reason for the higher price tags also have to do with supply. 

Amid shipping delays and inventory shortages, the demand for certain popular products far outweighs what is available in warehouses and on store shelves.

As a result, the discounts were significantly smaller this year — a drop of 12% compared to 27% last year for electronics, 18% compared to 20% for apparel and 8% compared to 20% for sporting goods.

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"While the worst-case supply chain disruptions seem to have been avoided, consumers are still concerned about shortages and inflation," Ted Rossman, the senior industry analyst for CreditCards.com, said in a press statement. 

"More than three-quarters of U.S. adults experienced product-related shopping problems in October, led by higher prices than usual (55%), items out of stock/backordered (47%) and shipping delays (35%)."

Inflation, which surged to a 31-year high of 6.2% in October, is expected to start taking a larger and larger toll on shopping cart prices in the future.

While items for this Black Friday and Cyber Monday were stocked months ago, rising costs will influence everything from diapers to popular electronics. 

"[Consumers] have only so much money and room on their credit cards," Marshal Cohen, chief industry advisor of The NPD Group, told TheStreet last week. "Higher prices, less promotions and cost of living increases mean less money to spend on gifts."