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Better Than a Tan: 10 Books on Getting Rich

Here's your money-making summer reading list.
Author:

It's Memorial Day weekend. What's on your summer reading list?

Here are ten suggestions from

TheStreet.com

.

1. Fiscal Fitness by Jack LaLanne and Matthew Rettick

Health Guru Jack LaLanne: Get Your Retirement Plan in Shape

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2. Jim Cramer's Stay Mad for Life: Get Rich, Stay Rich (Make Your Kids Even Richer) by James Cramer

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From Cramer on Stocks vs. Mutual Funds

(Video):

Farnoosh Torabi:

How do you know if you're a stock person or a fund person, Jim?

Jim Cramer:

Well, if you can't do the homework -- or if you can't read a balance sheet, or if you don't have time to listen to a conference call -- then you are, by default, a mutual fund person.

Watch the full video.

3. Applied Portfolio Management: How University of Kansas Students Generate Alpha to Beat the Street by Catherine Shenoy and Kent McCarthy

TheStreet Recommends

From Open Book: How to Beat the Street Like KU

: If the average investor is a large mutual fund, then being a small investor, like the APM class, is an advantage.

We

can look for mispricing in stocks that are unloved by the big mutual funds. Understanding the motivation of other market participants and how to use that information to your advantage is another key to successful investing.

Read the full article.

4. Fooling Some of the People All of the Time by David Einhorn

From Open Book: Einhorn on Short-Selling

: There is a growing populist sentiment against the hedge fund industry and short-sellers. I agree that it is unfair and elitist for only wealthy people and institutions to have access to some of the best money managers. I also agree that the hedge fund industry has its share of bad players -- as do all professions. However, short-sellers need encouragement. They are an important voice in the market. There is a collective benefit we all enjoy by having profit-motivated investors try to sort out the good companies from the bad.

Read the full article.

5. Creative Capital by Spencer Ante

From Open Book: Important Lessons from a Venture Capital Pioneer

: When evaluating an investment opportunity,

Georges Doriot relied on certain guideposts to base his decisions. Among the key factors:

Management: Doriot considered management as the most important business factor of success. Managers, wrote Doriot, should be "competent in their specialty and dedicated to the purpose of building a successful young company, even if inexperienced in many facets of business administration." The best managers have "technical creative competence," a "drive for recognition or monetary reward," and a strong work ethic "supplemented by a balanced personal life."

Innovation: Products or processes must be preferably beyond the developmental stage, protected by patents and know-how.

Growth: A field of business activity, usually technological, with growth characteristics.

Read the full article.

6. You're So Money: Live Rich, Even When You're Not by Farnoosh Torabi

From Open Book: How to Be 'So Money'

: With this book, I want to help my peers care about money and realize it can be a means to a brighter future. As a young adult, you just need to first accept that you do have options, you can make sound decisions, you can live your personalized version of the "good life," and that above all, you are so money.

Read the full article.

7. Extreme Value Hedging by Ronald Oral

From Open Book: Pick Stocks Like an Activist Investor

: Good activist investors, at their core, are great stock pickers.

Most experienced activist investors typically allocate capital to companies that will improve in value on their own, over a period of time. But, unlike mutual funds or other institutional investors, these insurgent investors won't sit back patiently and wait for that growth to happen.

Some are short-term extortion artists... Other activists are governance investors... in it for the long haul, and they often have the tacit or public support of the institutional investor base.

Many private investors jump on board immediately after activist funds take their insurgency campaigns public. Free riders, as many activists call the cadre of investors that buy into the stock after them, often cash out a few days later, leaving a small spike followed by a dip in the stock price in their wake. Private investors would be better advised to follow the lead of long-term governance investors. Share improvement may take these activists a long time to achieve, but the results are typically better and enduring.

Read the full article.

8. Invest Like a Shark by James "Rev Shark" DePorre

Invest Like Master Trader 'Rev Shark'

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9. Full of Bull by Stephen McClellan

From Open Book: How to Decipher Wall Street's Secret Code

: Iindividuals can learn to do their own security analysis -- that is, their own research -- and thereby avoid the many painful pitfalls that await those who reflexively jump at every euphoric or alarmist nugget of "noise" that emanates from the canyons of lower Manhattan. The book is replete with firsthand "been there, done that" insights.

For instance:

Stock ratings below the "Strong Buy" level normally connote caution or even pessimism on the part of the analyst. And believe it or not, any downgrade from the highest level is truly tantamount to a "Sell" recommendation. From the published rating alone, it is impossible to discern the magnitude of an analyst's enthusiasm or skepticism.

Read the full article.

10. Riding the Indian Tiger: Understanding India -- The World's Fastest Growing Market by William Nobrega and Ashish Sinha

From Finally, Some Helpful Passages on India

: If you're an investor, you need to know about India. Unfortunately, before

Riding the Indian Tiger

came out, snappy, all-in-one primers on India's past, present and future had been hard to come by.

This book is a must-read and earns a coveted Business Press Maven "Help" label, granted with great ceremony to books that help advance investor understanding. It is not a thrilling read, but the prose isn't wooden, and it's less than 250 pages. That means no excuses.

And here's the beautiful part: Place your finger down at random at almost any point in this book, and you'll learn something important, thought-provoking or, at the very least, interesting about a country that stands as a contradiction in a myriad of ways.

Read the full article.

Have a successful summer.

This article was written by a staff member of TheStreet.com.

The Street.com has a revenue-sharing relationship with Amazon.com under which it receives a portion of the revenue from Amazon.com book purchases by customers directed there from TheStreet.com.