Bradley Keoun

Bradley Keoun covers markets and finance for TheStreet.

A former reporter and editor for Bloomberg News in New York and Mexico City, he covered the financial crisis of 2008 and has written about U.S. banks, the energy industry and emerging markets. 

Keoun, who previously worked for the Gainesville (Fla.) Sun and Chicago Tribune, has a master's in journalism from the University of Florida and a bachelor's in electrical engineering from Duke University. You can reach him at bradley.keoun@thestreet.com and follow him on Twitter @liqquidity. 

Recent Articles By The Author

Morgan Stanley Hit by Trading, Investment-Banking Slump: Goldman Sachs

Morgan Stanley Hit by Trading, Investment-Banking Slump: Goldman Sachs

Despite buoyant stock markets in the first quarter and a rally in Treasury bonds, the biggest U.S. banks probably suffered steep declines in trading and investment-banking revenue during the period, partly due to the U.S. government's shutdown, according to Goldman Sachs analysts.

U.S. Aircraft Orders Plunged in February - Even Before Boeing Crash

U.S. Aircraft Orders Plunged in February - Even Before Boeing Crash

A steep drop in aircraft orders in February helped to drive a larger-than-expected drop in durable goods orders. The orders fell by 1.6%, according to the Census Bureau, greater than the 0.8% drop projected by economists.

As ETFs Gain on Mutual Funds, WisdomTree Emerges as Takeover Target

As ETFs Gain on Mutual Funds, WisdomTree Emerges as Takeover Target

WisdomTree Investments, a specialist in exchange-traded funds, could be an attractive takeover candidate for big money managers looking to catch up in the fast-growing ETF industry, according to Credit Suisse.

U.S. Manufacturing Activity Rebounds From Lowest in Two Years

U.S. Manufacturing Activity Rebounds From Lowest in Two Years

Activity in the U.S. manufacturing sector increased faster than expected last month, a new report shows, as the economy continues to give off mixed data signals.

U.S. Retail Sales Fall Unexpectedly in a Sign Consumers Are Cutting Back

U.S. Retail Sales Fall Unexpectedly in a Sign Consumers Are Cutting Back

U.S. retail sales unexpectedly slipped by 0.2% in February on a seasonally adjusted basis, in a sign that consumers might be cutting back as the economic stimulus fades from President Donald Trump's late-2017 tax cuts.

New Home Sales in U.S. Jump in February as Housing Market Firms

New Home Sales in U.S. Jump in February as Housing Market Firms

New home sales in the U.S. totaled 667,000 in February, up from a revised 636,000 in January, the Census Bureau reports. The gain was bigger than projected by economists, who had estimated February sales at 620,000.

U.S. Inflation Unexpectedly Slowed in January, Commerce Department Says

U.S. Inflation Unexpectedly Slowed in January, Commerce Department Says

The Federal Reserve's preferred inflation gauge rises 0.1% in January, leaving consumer prices up 1.8% over the past year. That pace represents a slowdown from the December rate of 2%, and may help to reinforce the central bank's case that there's little need for concern at the moment about runaway consumer prices.

Wells Fargo CEO's Retirement Placates a Senator - and Grumpy Investors

Wells Fargo CEO's Retirement Placates a Senator - and Grumpy Investors

The retirement of Wells Fargo chief executive Tim Sloan could help give the scandal-plagued bank a clean slate after sanctions from regulators, attacks from lawmakers and growing shareholder dismay.

Shadowy Lenders, Tech Players Pose Risk to Banking System: Fed Official

Shadowy Lenders, Tech Players Pose Risk to Banking System: Fed Official

Randal Quarles, the Federal Reserve's vice chair for supervision, says regulators need to be vigilant about new risks from lenders that operate outside of the strictest banking-industry rules - as well as from the increasing push by technology companies into lending and asset management.

JPMorgan Cuts Hundreds of Support Jobs After Annual Workforce Review

JPMorgan Cuts Hundreds of Support Jobs After Annual Workforce Review

JPMorgan Chase, the biggest U.S. bank, is eliminating hundreds of workers after an annual review of staffing levels in its asset- and wealth-management division.