Bradley Keoun

Bradley Keoun covers markets and finance for TheStreet.

A former reporter and editor for Bloomberg News in New York and Mexico City, he covered the financial crisis of 2008 and has written about U.S. banks, the energy industry and emerging markets. 

Keoun, who previously worked for the Gainesville (Fla.) Sun and Chicago Tribune, has a master's in journalism from the University of Florida and a bachelor's in electrical engineering from Duke University. You can reach him at bradley.keoun@thestreet.com and follow him on Twitter @liqquidity. 

Recent Articles By The Author

Fed Considers Letting Inflation Run Hot, Vice Chair Clarida Says

Fed Considers Letting Inflation Run Hot, Vice Chair Clarida Says

Federal Reserve Vice Chairman Richard Clarida tells a monetary-policy conference in New York that the central bank is considering whether to let inflation run above its 2% target to compensate for past periods of muted price increases.

Fed Must Watch Out for Inflation Surge: Fed's John Williams

Fed Must Watch Out for Inflation Surge: Fed's John Williams

Federal Reserve Bank of New York President John Williams, a top aide to Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, says officials must stay on alert for inflation even as the central bank pauses its years-long effort to prevent prices from surging.

Apple and Goldman Sachs to Offer Joint Credit Card - Report

Apple and Goldman Sachs to Offer Joint Credit Card - Report

The new venture will be paired with iPhone features and help users manage their money, The Wall Street Journal reports.

As Trump Economy Slows, New Data Show Lagging Business Confidence

As Trump Economy Slows, New Data Show Lagging Business Confidence

The Census Bureau reports that new orders for manufactured durable goods orders increased by 1.2% in December, below economists' average forecast for a 1.7% increase.

FOMC Minutes: Fed Says It'll Be 'Patient' in Raising Rates

FOMC Minutes: Fed Says It'll Be 'Patient' in Raising Rates

Minutes from the Fed's January meeting also show the Federal Open Market Committee discussed terminating or modifying a plan to reduce the central bank's roughly $4 trillion balance sheet.

As Fed Pauses on Interest Rates, Some Economists Now Project Cuts

As Fed Pauses on Interest Rates, Some Economists Now Project Cuts

Minutes from the Fed's January meeting, scheduled for release on Wednesday, could show the extent to which officials discussed terminating or modifying a plan to reduce the central bank's roughly $4 trillion balance sheet, which more than quadrupled in size during the financial crisis. And at least one top economist is already predicting that the central bank might cut interest rates later this year as growth slows.

Consumers Remain Confident as Economists Fret Over Quality of U.S. Data

Consumers Remain Confident as Economists Fret Over Quality of U.S. Data

The University of Michigan's index of consumer sentiment rises to a reading of 95.5 in February from 91.2 the prior month, contrasting with a separate report earlier this week from the Census Bureau that showed retail sales fell in December by the most in nine years.

JPMorgan's Foray Into Cryptocurrency Shows CEO Dimon's No Luddite

JPMorgan's Foray Into Cryptocurrency Shows CEO Dimon's No Luddite

JPMorgan Chase, whose CEO Jamie Dimon once described bitcoin as a fraud, introduces a new 'JPM Coin' for customers to use to make payments among themselves.

Gadfly Bove Quits Bank Stock Picking Because He Thinks Banks Are Going Down

Gadfly Bove Quits Bank Stock Picking Because He Thinks Banks Are Going Down

The five-decade Wall Street analyst Dick Bove just couldn't bring himself to raise money for a bank-stock fund at a time when he thinks banks are likely to be lousy stocks.

Wall Street Sees No Evil as Junky Loans Surpass $1.3 Trillion

Wall Street Sees No Evil as Junky Loans Surpass $1.3 Trillion

Loans to companies with low credit ratings swelled by 15% last year to $1.3 trillion, prompting warnings from the Federal Reserve and International Monetary Fund. Yet Wall Street firms that are deeply immersed in the market, from banks including JPMorgan Chase to private-equity firms like Blackstone, say they don't see what the problem is.