Bradley Keoun

Bradley Keoun covers markets and finance for TheStreet.

A former reporter and editor for Bloomberg News in New York and Mexico City, he covered the financial crisis of 2008 and has written about U.S. banks, the energy industry and emerging markets. 

Keoun, who previously worked for the Gainesville (Fla.) Sun and Chicago Tribune, has a master's in journalism from the University of Florida and a bachelor's in electrical engineering from Duke University. You can reach him at bradley.keoun@thestreet.com and follow him on Twitter @liqquidity. 

Recent Articles By The Author

As U.S. Trade Deficit Widens, Trump Proves Loser at Own Game

As U.S. Trade Deficit Widens, Trump Proves Loser at Own Game

When it comes to his oft-stated goal of reducing the U.S. trade deficit, President Donald Trump isn't winning. The current account deficit - a broad measure of the trade balance that also encompasses some investment flows - has averaged $48.9 billion a month so far in 2019, roughly 17% higher than in 2016, the last full year before Trump took office.

Fed Tests Clear JPMorgan, Other Big U.S. Banks for Dividends, Buybacks

Fed Tests Clear JPMorgan, Other Big U.S. Banks for Dividends, Buybacks

Banks quick to raise dividends and buybacks following Fed results.

Manufacturers Slip Again as Durable-Goods Orders Fall for Third Month in Four

Manufacturers Slip Again as Durable-Goods Orders Fall for Third Month in Four

New orders for manufactured durable goods slipped by 1.3% in May to $243.4 billion, the U.S. Census Bureau reports. Economists had forecast no change during the month.

Fed's Powell, Facing Dissent, Says Officials Shouldn't `Overreact' to Slowdown

Fed's Powell, Facing Dissent, Says Officials Shouldn't `Overreact' to Slowdown

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell says the central bank shouldn't 'overreact' to signals that the U.S. economy might be slowing. His comments, made during an onstage interview, came after at least one member of the central bank's monetary-policy committee voted last week to cut official U.S. interest rates, bucking Powell's push to keep them at their current level.

As Federal Reserve Flinches, This Official Sees No Harm in Waiting and Watching

As Federal Reserve Flinches, This Official Sees No Harm in Waiting and Watching

Federal Reserve officials last week scrapped a pledge to be 'patient'' when deciding whether to cut U.S. interest rates to ward off an economic downturn. The move was seen as inching the Fed closer to a possible reduction in July. But Robert Kaplan, president of the central bank's Dallas branch, argues in a new essay that 'additional time' is needed to evaluate whether to make any changes in monetary policy.

As Economy Creeps Into Old Age, Amazon's Bank Bets on Buyers With Bad Credit

As Economy Creeps Into Old Age, Amazon's Bank Bets on Buyers With Bad Credit

Synchrony, the bank spun off from General Electric in 2014, has posted impressive asset growth and profitability in recent years. But some investors are leery of the stock because of the potential for steep losses if the U.S. economy takes a turn for the worse.

U.S. Banks Pass Fed's 'Stress Test' With Room for Dividends, Buybacks

U.S. Banks Pass Fed's 'Stress Test' With Room for Dividends, Buybacks

The Federal Reserve's 'stress tests' of big banks requires them to maintain sufficient capital, even after a nightmare economic scenario in which stock prices fall by 65% and unemployment surges to 10%.

Hero or Scourge? Federal Reserve's Lone Wolf Explains Dissent on Interest Rates

Hero or Scourge? Federal Reserve's Lone Wolf Explains Dissent on Interest Rates

James Bullard, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, was the only member of the Federal Reserve's monetary-policy committee to vote this week for a cut in the official U.S. interest rate. The panel majority, led by Chair Jerome Powell, voted to keep the rate at 2.25% to 2.5% but warned of risks to the U.S. economy.

Fed Holds Rates Steady; Powell Says 'We Are Prepared to Move'

Fed Holds Rates Steady; Powell Says 'We Are Prepared to Move'

The Fed's monetary-policy committee voted to keep the benchmark U.S. interest rate at 2.25% to 2.5%, but warned of risks to the U.S. economy and dropped a pledge to remain 'patient' on future rate cuts.

As U.S. Economy Downshifts, Fed Chief Powell Prepares to Alter His Message

As U.S. Economy Downshifts, Fed Chief Powell Prepares to Alter His Message

The Federal Reserve's monetary-policy committee, after a two-day meeting that culminates on Wednesday, is likely to scrap a pledge for 'patience' on setting interest rates, paving a way for a rate reduction in July, according to economists at Deutsche Bank.