Bradley Keoun

Bradley Keoun covers markets and finance for TheStreet.

A former reporter and editor for Bloomberg News in New York and Mexico City, he covered the financial crisis of 2008 and has written about U.S. banks, the energy industry and emerging markets. 

Keoun, who previously worked for the Gainesville (Fla.) Sun and Chicago Tribune, has a master's in journalism from the University of Florida and a bachelor's in electrical engineering from Duke University. You can reach him at bradley.keoun@thestreet.com and follow him on Twitter @liqquidity. 

Recent Articles By The Author

U.S. Inflation Unexpectedly Slowed in February, Labor Department Says

U.S. Inflation Unexpectedly Slowed in February, Labor Department Says

Consumer prices rise 0.2% in February, leaving them up 1.5% over the past year. That figure falls short of economists' average estimate for a 1.6% price increase over the past 12 months.

Wells Fargo CEO Sloan Faces Lashing in Congress - From a New Tormentor

Wells Fargo CEO Sloan Faces Lashing in Congress - From a New Tormentor

Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan is scheduled to appear Tuesday before the U.S. House of Representatives' Financial Services Committee for the first time since Democrats, who are typically more critical of big banks than Republicans, took control of the chamber in last November's elections. The panel is led by Congresswoman Maxine Waters of Southern California, where some of Wells Fargo's recent scandals originated.

As Fed Tries to Reheat Economy, Consumers See Inflation Falling

As Fed Tries to Reheat Economy, Consumers See Inflation Falling

A new survey from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York shows that consumers see inflation declining in the years ahead. Federal Reserve officials recently have said they see falling inflation as a sign of a weakening economy.

U.S. Retail Sales Edge Higher in January After Two-Month Slump

U.S. Retail Sales Edge Higher in January After Two-Month Slump

A monthly report shows that retail sales in the U.S. rose 0.2% in January from the prior month. Economists had projected the figure to be flat with December's unexpectedly low level.

Fed's Powell Embraces Reality of 'Untried' Monetary Policies in New Era

Fed's Powell Embraces Reality of 'Untried' Monetary Policies in New Era

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell told economists that none of the central bank's efforts to 'normalize' monetary policy over a decade after the 2008 financial crisis had been previously tested.

U.S. Economy Adds 20,000 Jobs in February, Far Fewer Than Expected

U.S. Economy Adds 20,000 Jobs in February, Far Fewer Than Expected

A monthly report on February jobs shows that nonfarm employers added 20,000 jobs during the month, down from 304,000 the prior month.

Citigroup CEO Gets Pay Raise of 4.3%, Smallest on Wall Street

Citigroup CEO Gets Pay Raise of 4.3%, Smallest on Wall Street

Citigroup CEO Michael Corbat got a 4.3% pay raise to $24 million, as the bank's board gave him an overall report card tantamount to a B-minus.

U.S. Workers Leave the Couch to Catch Powerful Jobs Wave

U.S. Workers Leave the Couch to Catch Powerful Jobs Wave

A monthly report on February jobs growth due Friday from the U.S. Labor Department is expected to show that nonfarm employers added about 181,000 jobs during the month, down from 304,000 the prior month, based on a survey by the data provider FactSet. But wages are accelerating, and the unemployment rate probably fell close to a half-century low.

Economy Still Growing in Most Parts of U.S., Fed 'Beige Book' Shows

Economy Still Growing in Most Parts of U.S., Fed 'Beige Book' Shows

The Federal Reserve's Beige Book for March showed that economic activity continues to expand in 10 of 12 Federal Reserve regions, with the exception of the Philadelphia and St. Louis regions.

Rapid Growth in Junk Bonds and Loans Poses Risks, Dallas Fed Chief Says

Rapid Growth in Junk Bonds and Loans Poses Risks, Dallas Fed Chief Says

A rapid increase over the past decade in the amount of debt taken out by corporations could aggravate the severity of an economic downturn, according to Robert Kaplan, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.