Bradley Keoun

Bradley Keoun covers markets and finance for TheStreet.

A former reporter and editor for Bloomberg News in New York and Mexico City, he covered the financial crisis of 2008 and has written about U.S. banks, the energy industry and emerging markets. 

Keoun, who previously worked for the Gainesville (Fla.) Sun and Chicago Tribune, has a master's in journalism from the University of Florida and a bachelor's in electrical engineering from Duke University. You can reach him at bradley.keoun@thestreet.com and follow him on Twitter @liqquidity. 

Recent Articles By The Author

New Wall Street Tragicomedy 'Schwarzman's Billions' Features Blackstone CEO

New Wall Street Tragicomedy 'Schwarzman's Billions' Features Blackstone CEO

The five biggest U.S. private-equity firms have raised almost $350 billion of 'dry powder' from pension funds, foreign governments and other institutional investors that must now be spent on everything from corporate acquisitions to business loans and real estate. The problem is, the assets have gotten too expensive.

Low Inflation Rate Confounds Economists, Though Maybe the Internet Explains It

Low Inflation Rate Confounds Economists, Though Maybe the Internet Explains It

The U.S. unemployment rate is at 3.6%, its lowest since December 1969, but a scarcity of workers hasn't translated to a surge in consumer prices. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell says rapid advances in technology might be one factor.

TD Ameritrade Cuts Fees on ETF Trades in Further Blow to Mutual Funds

TD Ameritrade Cuts Fees on ETF Trades in Further Blow to Mutual Funds

As competition heats up in the exchange-traded funds industry, TD Ameritrade nearly doubles the roster of ETFs eligible for commission-free purchases.

Facebook Reportedly Developing a Cryptocurrency Payment System

Facebook Reportedly Developing a Cryptocurrency Payment System

The social media giant's effort would likely represent the most mainstream application yet of cryptocurrency.

U.S. Unemployment Falls to Lowest in Half Century as Trump Job Machine Cranks

U.S. Unemployment Falls to Lowest in Half Century as Trump Job Machine Cranks

The Labor Department says U.S. employers added 263,000 jobs in April, well above economists' average estimates of 181,000. In a milestone, the U.S. unemployment rate fell to 3.6%, its lowest since December 1969.

Trump Economy Keeps Creating Jobs, Jobs, Jobs Along With Debt, Debt, Debt

Trump Economy Keeps Creating Jobs, Jobs, Jobs Along With Debt, Debt, Debt

A report due Friday from the Labor Department is expected to show that U.S. employers added 181,000 jobs in April, though some economists say the growth may have been even stronger. The cost is annual federal budget deficits estimated at more than $1 trillion.

Federal Reserve Holds U.S. Interest Rates Steady, Sees 'Sustained Expansion'

Federal Reserve Holds U.S. Interest Rates Steady, Sees 'Sustained Expansion'

The Federal Reserve, led by Chair Jerome Powell, voted Wednesday after a two-day meeting in Washington to hold official U.S. interest rates steady in their current range of 2.25% to 2.5%.

U.S. Jobs Increased by 275,000 in April, Most in Nine Months, ADP Says

U.S. Jobs Increased by 275,000 in April, Most in Nine Months, ADP Says

Automatic Data Processing, the payrolls servicing company, says U.S. jobs increased by 275,000 in April, the most in nine months. That's up from about 129,000 in March, and economists had projected a March reading of 176,000.

For Federal Reserve Chair Powell, Nothing Is the Only Thing to Do

For Federal Reserve Chair Powell, Nothing Is the Only Thing to Do

The Federal Reserve, led by Chair Jerome Powell, is unlikely to make any changes to U.S. interest rates or broader monetary policy at its meeting Wednesday and probably won't even hint at future changes. With growth on a solid footing, unemployment close to a half-century low, inflation practically nonexistent and President Donald Trump carping at Powell's every move, there's no rational motive for the central bank to intervene.

Consumer Confidence Jumps Faster Than Expected as U.S. Economy Improves

Consumer Confidence Jumps Faster Than Expected as U.S. Economy Improves

A monthly survey from the Conference Board shows that consumer confidence rebounded faster than expected in April amid signs that the economy is reheating.