Bradley Keoun

Bradley Keoun covers markets and finance for TheStreet.

A former reporter and editor for Bloomberg News in New York and Mexico City, he covered the financial crisis of 2008 and has written about U.S. banks, the energy industry and emerging markets. 

Keoun, who previously worked for the Gainesville (Fla.) Sun and Chicago Tribune, has a master's in journalism from the University of Florida and a bachelor's in electrical engineering from Duke University. You can reach him at bradley.keoun@thestreet.com and follow him on Twitter @liqquidity. 

Recent Articles By The Author

Music 'Still Playing' in Junk-Bond Market Even After Ford Hit With Downgrade

Music 'Still Playing' in Junk-Bond Market Even After Ford Hit With Downgrade

Risks are growing in the junk-bond market as low interest rates spur higher risk-taking on the part of yield-hungry investors, Bank of America warns in a new report.

Consumer Sentiment Rebounds as Trade Anxieties Subside, U. Michigan Survey Shows

Consumer Sentiment Rebounds as Trade Anxieties Subside, U. Michigan Survey Shows

The University of Michigan says its consumer-sentiment index jumps to a reading of 92 during the first part of September, rebounding after a plunge in August, when President Donald Trump's escalation of the trade war with China roiled U.S. stock and bond markets.

U.S. Retail Sales Stagnated in August, Following Amazon's 'Prime Day' in July

U.S. Retail Sales Stagnated in August, Following Amazon's 'Prime Day' in July

After robust retail sales in July, thanks to Amazon's Prime Day event and discounts from competing stores, consumers reined in their spending in August, the Census Bureau says.

Consumers Pared Back Spending Last Month, Exhausted After Amazon's 'Prime Day'

Consumers Pared Back Spending Last Month, Exhausted After Amazon's 'Prime Day'

After robust retail sales in July, thanks to Amazon's Prime Day event and discounts from competing stores, consumers probably reined in their spending in August, Bank of America says in a new report, citing its own database of credit-card and debit-card lending.

Mortgage Rates Hit 3-Year Low but Banks Are Making It Harder to Get a Loan

Mortgage Rates Hit 3-Year Low but Banks Are Making It Harder to Get a Loan

The Mortgage Bankers Association says U.S. lenders tightened their mortgage-underwriting standards last month by the most in 2019, even as falling interest rates led to a surge in loan applications.

U.S. Inflation Falls With Gas Prices but Prices Jump on Used Cars, Medical Care

U.S. Inflation Falls With Gas Prices but Prices Jump on Used Cars, Medical Care

Prices on consumer purchases, excluding food and energy items like gasoline, rise by 0.3% in August, faster than the 0.2% clip projected by economists. Over the past year, these 'core' consumer prices have climbed 2.4%, the fastest since 2018 and accelerating from July's pace of 2.3%.

U.S. Mortgage Boom Resumes as Interest Rates Fall to 3-Year Low

U.S. Mortgage Boom Resumes as Interest Rates Fall to 3-Year Low

Applications for new home loans increased by 2% last week, as the average fixed interest rate on a 30-year conventional mortgage rate fell to a three-year low, the Mortgage Bankers Association says.

Gemini, the Winklevoss Twins' Crypto Exchange, Has Built a Better Bitcoin Vault

Gemini, the Winklevoss Twins' Crypto Exchange, Has Built a Better Bitcoin Vault

The race is on among a handful of boutique financial firms and cryptocurrency exchanges trying to establish dominance in the business of custody - the safekeeping of assets, similar to the way a bank holds cash and electronic deposits.

Optimism Wanes at U.S. Small Businesses as Recession Warnings Mount

Optimism Wanes at U.S. Small Businesses as Recession Warnings Mount

The National Federation of Independent Business says its optimism index falls by 1.6 points to a reading of 103.1 in August.

How Deeply Will the Fed Cut? Bank of America, Initially a Skeptic, Goes All In

How Deeply Will the Fed Cut? Bank of America, Initially a Skeptic, Goes All In

In early July, economists with Bank of America argued that the U.S. economy was strong enough that the Federal Reserve didn't need to cut interest rates. A week later, they backtracked and joined the consensus betting on a July rate cut, which happened. Now, the bank's economists are predicting three more cuts before the year is out.