Bradley Keoun

Bradley Keoun covers markets and finance for TheStreet.

A former reporter and editor for Bloomberg News in New York and Mexico City, he covered the financial crisis of 2008 and has written about U.S. banks, the energy industry and emerging markets. 

Keoun, who previously worked for the Gainesville (Fla.) Sun and Chicago Tribune, has a master's in journalism from the University of Florida and a bachelor's in electrical engineering from Duke University. You can reach him at bradley.keoun@thestreet.com and follow him on Twitter @liqquidity. 

Recent Articles By The Author

U.S. Economy Added 155,000 Jobs in November, Fewer Than Expected

U.S. Economy Added 155,000 Jobs in November, Fewer Than Expected

A Labor Department report shows that the U.S. economy added 155,000 jobs in November, down from 250,000 the prior month. Analysts had predicted gains of 195,000. The report comes amid heightened speculation that the economy is slowing.

U.S. Jobs Report Could Bring Further Sign Economy Is Losing Steam

U.S. Jobs Report Could Bring Further Sign Economy Is Losing Steam

Recent economic indicators have spurred speculation among traders that the economic stimulus from President Donald Trump's $1.5 trillion of tax cuts might already be fading. A report this week on U.S. jobs growth in November could provide additional evidence.

Fed Considered Revising Pledge of `Further Gradual' Rate Hikes

Fed Considered Revising Pledge of `Further Gradual' Rate Hikes

A day after Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said in a speech in New York that interest rates were now "just below" a neutral level, minutes from the central bank's meeting earlier this month show that officials discussed revising a pledge for "further gradual" rate hikes.

Fed Chief's Rate Rise Remarks Not as Dovish as Market Inferred

Fed Chief's Rate Rise Remarks Not as Dovish as Market Inferred

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said in a speech in New York that interest rates were now "just below" a neutral level, sending U.S. stock markets soaring. Some economists say traders may have overreacted to a "semantic" shift in verbiage.

Fed Chief Powell Sees No 'Dangerous Excesses' in Stock Market

Fed Chief Powell Sees No 'Dangerous Excesses' in Stock Market

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said in a speech in New York that there are currently no "dangerous excesses" in the stock market that might threaten the financial system.

Banks Stand Behind Shadowy Junk-Loan Market as Risks Mount, S&P Says

Banks Stand Behind Shadowy Junk-Loan Market as Risks Mount, S&P Says

A new report from Standard & Poor's shows that big U.S. banks often stand behind the shadowy, less-regulated lenders at the heart of the fast-growing, $1.3 trillion market for loans to companies with junky credit ratings.

As Stock Market Reels, the Federal Reserve Doesn't Feel Your Pain

As Stock Market Reels, the Federal Reserve Doesn't Feel Your Pain

Richard Clarida, the Fed's vice chairman, emphasized the need for "data dependence" in a speech on Tuesday, Nov. 27, focusing on economic growth, inflation and the unemployment rate.

Stock Market Correction Puts Federal Reserve's Powell in Hot Seat

Stock Market Correction Puts Federal Reserve's Powell in Hot Seat

Traders in futures markets now see a 34% chance of that the Federal Reserve will raise U.S. interest rates two times by next March, down from 49% just a month ago, FactSet data show.

Trump Economy Faces New Threat as Payments Rise on National Debt

Trump Economy Faces New Threat as Payments Rise on National Debt

President Donald Trump's tax cuts have increased the national debt, and now the bill is coming due: The U.S. government's interest costs surged 20% during the last fiscal year and are projected to nearly double over the next five years, eclipsing the budget for military spending.

IMF Sounds 'Alarm' on Junk Loans as Warren Presses U.S. Regulators

IMF Sounds 'Alarm' on Junk Loans as Warren Presses U.S. Regulators

Issuance of junk-grade corporate loans is surging, even as underwriting standards deteriorate, pushing the market toward a danger point, according to the International Monetary Fund.