Bradley Keoun

Bradley Keoun covers markets and finance for TheStreet.

A former reporter and editor for Bloomberg News in New York and Mexico City, he covered the financial crisis of 2008 and has written about U.S. banks, the energy industry and emerging markets. 

Keoun, who previously worked for the Gainesville (Fla.) Sun and Chicago Tribune, has a master's in journalism from the University of Florida and a bachelor's in electrical engineering from Duke University. You can reach him at bradley.keoun@thestreet.com and follow him on Twitter @liqquidity. 

Recent Articles By The Author

Yes, It's Time to Worry About Wall Street's 'Fear Gauge' Waking Up

Yes, It's Time to Worry About Wall Street's 'Fear Gauge' Waking Up

Central-bank liquidity injections have helped to lull the U.S. stock market into a sense of complacency. That could come to an end this year, says a Wells Fargo analyst.

AllianceBernstein's Biggest Holder Saw Ex-CEO as Wrong Guy -- With Right Ideas

AllianceBernstein's Biggest Holder Saw Ex-CEO as Wrong Guy -- With Right Ideas

New Alliance Bernstein CEO Seth Bernstein and executives of major shareholder AXA have indicated they're inclined to keep former chief Peter Kraus's strategies, despite his unceremonious dismissal.

Here Comes More Lucrative Dividends and Stock Buybacks at JPMorgan, Other Banks Thanks to Trump

Here Comes More Lucrative Dividends and Stock Buybacks at JPMorgan, Other Banks Thanks to Trump

Regulators have pressured U.S. banks in recent years to hoard capital. Now, that's about to change.

Boston Fed's Rosengren Says Economy Strong Enough for Higher Rates

Boston Fed's Rosengren Says Economy Strong Enough for Higher Rates

Boston Fed President Eric Rosengren said the U.S. economy's sluggish pace in the first quarter was a temporary lull, with a higher pace of growth set to resume this year.

Ally, Santander Face Reckoning After Auto-Lending Boom, S&P Says

Ally, Santander Face Reckoning After Auto-Lending Boom, S&P Says

U.S. auto lending has surged in recent years to a record $1.1 trillion, partly fueled by low interest rates and low downpayment requirements. Now delinquencies are starting to rise.