Bradley Keoun

Bradley Keoun covers markets and finance for TheStreet.

A former reporter and editor for Bloomberg News in New York and Mexico City, he covered the financial crisis of 2008 and has written about U.S. banks, the energy industry and emerging markets. 

Keoun, who previously worked for the Gainesville (Fla.) Sun and Chicago Tribune, has a master's in journalism from the University of Florida and a bachelor's in electrical engineering from Duke University. You can reach him at bradley.keoun@thestreet.com and follow him on Twitter @liqquidity. 

Recent Articles By The Author

Federal Reserve Signals Easier Path on Monetary Policy as Economy Slows

Federal Reserve Signals Easier Path on Monetary Policy as Economy Slows

The Federal Reserve, led by Chairman Jerome Powell, said it will hold interest rates steady in their current range from 2.25% to 2.5%, while waiting for signs that the economy is stabilizing.

For Federal Reserve, Inaction Is Best Policy as Economy Nears Juncture

For Federal Reserve, Inaction Is Best Policy as Economy Nears Juncture

The Federal Reserve, led by Chairman Jerome Powell, is widely expected to leave interest rates unchanged at its meeting this week.

U.S. Consumer Confidence Improves With the Jobs Market

U.S. Consumer Confidence Improves With the Jobs Market

A monthly survey from the University of Michigan shows that consumer confidence improved faster than expected last month, even as a separate Federal Reserve report shows that manufacturers are mired in a slowdown.

Retail Sales to Rebound as Delayed Tax Refunds Arrive: Bank of America

Retail Sales to Rebound as Delayed Tax Refunds Arrive: Bank of America

U.S. retail sales excluding autos slipped by 0.1% in February, Bank of America says in a report that cited the bank's own credit- and debit-card spending data. The decline was partly caused by delays in tax refunds, which hit low-income households especially hard.

New Home Sales in U.S. Fall Faster Than Expected in January

New Home Sales in U.S. Fall Faster Than Expected in January

New home sales in the U.S. totaled 607,000 in January, down from 652,000 in December, the Census Bureau reports. The drop was steeper than projected by economists, who had estimated January sales at 620,000.

Mutual Funds, Eviscerated by ETFs, Face New Humiliation, Moody's Says

Mutual Funds, Eviscerated by ETFs, Face New Humiliation, Moody's Says

Moody's Investors Service predicts active stock- and bond-picking firms' share of the money-management industry will be overtaken as soon as 2021 by 'passive' vehicles like index-tracking mutual funds and exchange-traded funds.

U.S. Durable Goods Orders Unexpectedly Fall in New Sign of Slowdown

U.S. Durable Goods Orders Unexpectedly Fall in New Sign of Slowdown

The Census Bureau reports that new orders for manufactured durable goods orders outside of the transportation industry fell by 0.1% in January. Economists were calling for a 0.2% increase.

Nasdaq Picked to Operate New Cryptocurrency Exchange for Startup Bcause

Nasdaq Picked to Operate New Cryptocurrency Exchange for Startup Bcause

Bcause, a startup vying to open a new cryptocurrency-derivatives exchange alongside a mining facility for the digital coins, chooses Nasdaq to provide technology for matching trades, clearing and market surveillance.

Was Trump Right About the Fed Raising Interest Rates Too Far, Too Fast?

Was Trump Right About the Fed Raising Interest Rates Too Far, Too Fast?

President Donald Trump's oft-repeated criticisms of Federal Reserve interest-rate hikes have been labeled by some economists as an assault on the central bank's independence. But Joe Lavorgna, chief Americas economist for the French bank Natixis, says that at least one measure of effective interest rates shows that the Fed's recent efforts may have exceeded the mid-2000s cycle of monetary tightening that helped to trigger the 2008 financial crisis.

Wells Fargo Is `Too Big to Manage,' U.S. Lawmaker Waters Tells CEO

Wells Fargo Is `Too Big to Manage,' U.S. Lawmaker Waters Tells CEO

Wells Fargo CEO Tim Sloan appeared Tuesday before the U.S. House of Representatives' Financial Services Committee for the first time since Democrats, who are typically more critical of big banks than Republicans, took control of the chamber in last November's elections. The panel's leader, Congresswoman Maxine Waters of Southern California, scolded Sloan, but so did Republicans on the committee.