Jeffrey Kanige

As Editor in Chief, Jeffrey Kanige oversees all editorial operations for The Deal. Most recently he has led efforts to develop more in-depth coverage of markets and debt financing.

 

A lawyer by training, Jeff has been a professional writer and editor for 27 years. He entered the industry as a stringer for the Courier-News, a daily newspaper in central New Jersey.

 

As a writer for New Jersey Reporter, a public policy journal based in Princeton, he won several awards for his coverage of state politics and government, and served as a political commentator and advisor for television stations in New Jersey and Philadelphia.

 

He has also covered the courts for Manhattan Lawyer, a unit of American Lawyer Media, worked as a reporter for the New Jersey Law Journal and was associate editor of the Law Journal and assistant managing editor for the New York Law Journal. Jeff has been with The Deal since its inception in 1999.

Recent Articles By The Author

Revenge of the Trumps: The Real Reason Donald Trump Won the Republican Nomination

Revenge of the Trumps: The Real Reason Donald Trump Won the Republican Nomination

Winning the GOP presidential nod was too much for one man. So the presumptive nominee must have opted for an unusual form of self-help.

How Donald Trump Wins the White House

How Donald Trump Wins the White House

It's all over but the shouting. Only one question remains. Where will the president-elect be on Jan. 20 2017?

Forget Trump. Never Mind Clinton. Get Ready for President Pataki

Forget Trump. Never Mind Clinton. Get Ready for President Pataki

Assume that everything you thought you knew about politics is wrong. This time around, it's a reasonable assumption.

The GOP Warmup Act Is Going to Be Seismic

The GOP Warmup Act Is Going to Be Seismic

If by seismic we mean slow, grinding and ending with a tremor.

Watch Out, Hillary: The Doormats Will Be Gunning For You

Watch Out, Hillary: The Doormats Will Be Gunning For You

Democratic candidates Jim Webb, Lincoln Chafee or Martin O'Malley have yet to gain traction among Democratic primary voters. It's time to channel their inner Newt Gingrich.

Hitting Peak Auto: Why the Big Three May Soon Look Very Different

Hitting Peak Auto: Why the Big Three May Soon Look Very Different

The car business faces a shift down the road as the car culture changes.

Cash-rich Repsol Searches for Assets to Fill Its Argentina Void

Cash-rich Repsol Searches for Assets to Fill Its Argentina Void

Spanish oil company Repsol lost a huge chunk of its proven reserves in a dispute with Argentina over YPF, a South American subsidiary.

For Time Inc. and Other Media Companies, Breaking Up Is Cool

For Time Inc. and Other Media Companies, Breaking Up Is Cool

On Friday, the publisher of Time, Sports Illustrated, People and Fortune will set out on its own, as Time Warner completes its spinoff. And Time isn't the only media company splitting apart.

Searching for Stability, Bill Ackman Plans to go Public in London

Searching for Stability, Bill Ackman Plans to go Public in London

Billionaire Bill Ackman has never been reluctant to blaze trails. Now he's considering listing his offshore fund in London, a move that would free him from the whims of wimpy investors.

GE and Pfizer Fail to Read Takeover Defenses in Europe

GE and Pfizer Fail to Read Takeover Defenses in Europe

Jeff Immelt and Ian Read took different approaches in their quests to acquire big targets in France and England, but ended up in similar situations. General Electric's CEO started by reaching a friendly agreement with Alstom's board. When French politicians found out, they jumped in to save the company from the Americans. Pfizer's chief began by courting British government officials. And when AstraZeneca's directors received Read's $100 billion offer — the biggest ever for a U.K. target — they dismissed it as too low. Both deals could still get done. For now, though, political and cultural issues dominate the debates. The merits of the mergers are secondary.