Jonathan Braude

Jonathan Braude is a senior writer in The Deal's London bureau, where he covers M&A and private equity across the U.K. and Europe. He also provides early morning European markets coverage for TheStreet. Prior to joining The Deal, Braude was a writer, political reporter and columnist for the South China Morning Post in Hong Kong and, before that, worked in Brussels, covering the European Union and NATO. He has written for a number of print and broadcasting outlets including the BBC, The Times of London and Jane's Defense Weekly. Braude speaks German, French and Hebrew and reads Spanish and Dutch.

Recent Articles By The Author

Deutsche Bank Plummets as Merkel Reported to Rule Out Diplomatic or Financial Help

Deutsche Bank Plummets as Merkel Reported to Rule Out Diplomatic or Financial Help

Pressure mounts on Germany's largest bank as Focus magazine reports Chancellor Merkel refused to mediate in negotiations over a $14 billion DoJ fine and rules out financial aid.

BHP Billiton Digs In Over Australian Tax Demand

BHP Billiton Digs In Over Australian Tax Demand

The Australian miner is in dispute with Canberra over $772 billion of back taxes, mostly relating to a marketing business which routes sales through Singapore. It may go to court.

SoftBank Books a Ride on Uber's Southeast Asian Rival Grab

SoftBank Books a Ride on Uber's Southeast Asian Rival Grab

SoftBank leads a $750 million funding round for the Singapore-based ride-hailing platform, declaring it the clear winner in a region which Uber is also targeting.

European Markets Weaken as Banks Follow Deutsche Bank Down

European Markets Weaken as Banks Follow Deutsche Bank Down

Deutsche Bank swoons as the Department of Justice demands $14 billion for mis-selling of mortgage securities, pulling other European lenders down.

Australia and Japan Markets Rebound After Torrid Week

Australia and Japan Markets Rebound After Torrid Week

Much of Asia is closed for the mid-Autumn festival holiday, but Sydney and Tokyo follow Wall Street's upward lead as interest rate rise fears recede.