Susan Antilla

Susan Antilla is an award-winning journalist and the Founding Fellow of TheStreet Foundation, a nonprofit organization with the goal of supporting and expanding financial literacy for consumers through investigative journalism and custom research on high-impact financial topics.

 

She has been a financial journalist for 30 years, writing for The New York Times, USA Today and Bloomberg View, among others. Antilla is author of Tales From the Boom-Boom Room, the 2002 book that exposed a culture of sexual harassment at financial companies. She received a bachelor of arts degree from Manhattanville College and a master of arts in journalism degree from New York University. Antilla is an adjunct professor of journalism at Fairfield University.

Recent Articles By The Author

Women at Fox News, Goldman Sachs: 'No Discrimination to See Here, Folks, Just Keep Moving Along'

Women at Fox News, Goldman Sachs: 'No Discrimination to See Here, Folks, Just Keep Moving Along'

Many women at Fox News have come out in resounding support of their embattled CEO Roger Ailes, who was sued for sexual harassment. Do their opinions matter?

The One Thing About Financial Literacy Wall Street Doesn't Want You to Learn

The One Thing About Financial Literacy Wall Street Doesn't Want You to Learn

Finra's Investor Education Foundation released a study Tuesday that said financial literacy has declined since 2009. A big part of the problem is the wrong people are doing the teaching.

The Unbelievable Story of One Broker and Her Firm Fighting to Clean Her Tarnished Record

The Unbelievable Story of One Broker and Her Firm Fighting to Clean Her Tarnished Record

Dozens of former AT&T employees filed complaints after Kathleen J. Tarr put them in high-commission products like non-traded REITs. She and her former firm want to clean up her record.

How Bad Financial Advice Can Literally Make You Sick

How Bad Financial Advice Can Literally Make You Sick

It's bad enough that so many investors lose money at the hands of incompetent or corrupt advisers. But when stress-related health problems kick in, some are victimized a second time.

How Wall Street Keeps Outrageous Gender Bias Quiet 20 Years After the Boom-Boom Room

How Wall Street Keeps Outrageous Gender Bias Quiet 20 Years After the Boom-Boom Room

Hopes for reform were high when women at Smith Barney filed a discrimination lawsuit 20 years ago last month. Since then, the industry has worked hard to keep complaints quiet.