Ted Reed

Ted Reed covers the airline industry. He previously covered airlines for The Miami Herald and The Charlotte Observer. He also worked for US Airways, writing speeches for executives and stories for internal publications. He is the author of "Carl Furillo: Brooklyn Dodgers All-Star," and co-author of "American Airlines, US Airways and the Creation of the World's Largest Airline." He graduated from Wesleyan University and Columbia University School of Journalism.

 


Recent Articles By The Author

Airline Shares Fall as Capacity Gains and Unit Revenue Guidance Raise Doubts

Airline Shares Fall as Capacity Gains and Unit Revenue Guidance Raise Doubts

American, Delta and Southwest reduce first-quarter unit revenue guidance, while a key analyst sees a 'visceral reaction' to capacity increases by United and others.

As Quarter Ends, Airlines Face Questions on Capacity Growth and Trump's Impact

As Quarter Ends, Airlines Face Questions on Capacity Growth and Trump's Impact

American, Delta and United are all adding domestic capacity, worrying some analysts. Meanwhile, international travel to the U.S. may be diminished by the president's proposed travel ban.

Loyalty Programs Add Hidden Value at American, Delta and United, Analyst Says

Loyalty Programs Add Hidden Value at American, Delta and United, Analyst Says

American, Delta, United, Southwest and Alaska shares are severely undervalued because the value of frequent flier programs is hidden, according to a new report.

American Airlines CEO: How Do We Beat Delta? We Bet on New Aircraft

American Airlines CEO: How Do We Beat Delta? We Bet on New Aircraft

American Airlines has spent about $20 billion in aircraft in four years, enabling 'the most aggressive fleet modernization in the history of the industry,' says CEO Doug Parker.

Wall Street to United Airlines: It's Not Nice to Add Capacity and Not Tell Us

Wall Street to United Airlines: It's Not Nice to Add Capacity and Not Tell Us

United Airlines CEO Oscar Munoz unveils above-guidance capacity growth plans at an investor conference, weeks after new routes are announced. Wall Street isn't happy.