Jim Cramer Breaks Down What the General Electric Upgrade Means for the Markets

 It's been a crazy week in the markets. 

TheStreet's Staff reported Wall Street finished higher on Wednesday, Dec. 12, as investors cheered progress in U.S.-China trade talks and after a report said China was planning a new program that promised greater access for foreign companies.

Stocks advanced on Thursday, Dec. 13, and shares in Asia closed higher as trade tensions eased between the U.S. and China, the world's two largest economies.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 74 points, or 0.3%, to 24,601, the S&P 500 gained 0.37%, and the Nasdaq was up 0.32%.

After receiving an upgrade from JPMorgan's Stephen Tusa, General Electric (GE) is soaring. At 9:43 a.m., GE was up nearly 10% to $7.33 a share.

The company is Real Money's stock of the day

GE's Upgrade

This was the first time in two and a half years and that the company had gotten an upgrade from JPMorgan.

TheStreet's Martin Baccardax broke the news.

 Tusa lifted his rating to "neutral" from "underweight", a view he had held since May of 2016, and although he maintained an $8 price target on the stock, he said the ""known unknowns" surrounding the company are now easier to quantify.

"Key to the story, in our view, is the outcome of 'known unknowns' in near term, which are better understood and around which debate is more balanced, as opposed to being overlooked by most bulls in the past," Tusa said. "We now believe a more negative outcome one these liabilities (equity dilution is one) is at least partially discounted, and it's possible the company can execute its way through an elongated workout that limits near-term downside."

GE shares were marked 12.7% higher in pre-market trading, indicating an opening bell price of $7.56 each. The move would be the biggest single-day gain in more than two years and trim the stock's year-to-date decline to around 56%.

TheStreet's technical expert, Bruce Kamich, noted earlier this week that his charts were showing a "bullish divergence", but was doubtful the stock could produce a "meaningful advance" on its own.