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Future Of The Indian Defense Industry - Market Attractiveness, Competitive Landscape And Forecasts To 2018

NEW YORK, April 8, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Future of the Indian Defense Industry - Market Attractiveness, Competitive Landscape and Forecasts to 2018

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Product SynopsisThis report is the result of SDI's extensive market and company research covering the Indian defense industry, and provides detailed analysis of both historic and forecast defense industry values including key growth stimulators, analysis of the leading companies in the industry, and key news. Introduction and Landscape Why was the report written?The Future of the Indian Defense Industry – Market Attractiveness, Competitive Landscape and Forecasts to 2018 offers the reader an insight into the market opportunities and entry strategies adopted by foreign original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to gain a market share in the Indian defense industry. What is the current market landscape and what is changing?The Indian defense market offers numerous market opportunities to both domestic and foreign manufacturers. As one of the largest defense equipment markets in the world, the country is expected to spend US$119.3 billion on capital acquisition alone during the forecast period. In the next two years, the country is forecast to spend a significant amount of money on homeland security, intelligence, and cyber security, primarily due to an increasingly hazardous geopolitical environment, the threat of terrorism, and internal security concerns. Some more factors that are likely to influence the future growth course of the defense sector in India are further development of the defense procurement process, the formation and implementation of a defense industrialization strategy to coordinate the use of offsets, transfer of technology, FDI and revisions to the taxation regime, and incentives. What are the key drivers behind recent market changes?Indian defense expenditure is primarily driven by the need to replace the country's aging military hardware and to protect India from its hostile neighbors. Strong economic growth has also fueled India's defense industry growth. Moreover, given that the Chinese market is closed to the world, India remains the primary place within Asia where major defense systems are sold. What makes this report unique and essential to read?The Future of the Indian Defense Industry – Market Attractiveness, Competitive Landscape and Forecasts to 2018 provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2014 to 2018, including highlights of key growth stimulators. It also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides a detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas. Key Features and BenefitsThe report provides detailed analysis of the current industry size and growth expectations from 2014 to 2018, including highlights of key growth stimulators, and also benchmarks the industry against key global markets and provides a detailed understanding of emerging opportunities in specific areas.The report includes trend analysis of imports and exports, together with their implications and impact on the Indian defense industry.The report covers five forces analysis to identify various power centers in the industry and how these are expected to develop in the future.The report allows readers to identify possible ways to enter the market, together with detailed descriptions of how existing companies have entered the market, including key contracts, alliances, and strategic initiatives.The report helps the reader to understand the competitive landscape of the defense industry in India. It provides an overview of key defense companies, both domestic and foreign, together with insights such as key alliances, strategic initiatives, and a brief financial analysis. Key Market IssuesIntroduced under the DPP 2005 and developed further in 2012, the offset policy encourages the indigenous Indian defense industry to play a major role in meeting the needs of the armed forces by restricting FDI to 26%. It is expected that small- and medium-sized enterprises will benefit from the offsets, leading to a larger presence of private companies in the defense industry. Additionally, the revised DOG's 50% indigenous requirement and timeframe to achieve that will have a negative impact on the domestic defense industry. It is a known fact that very few Indian companies can offer products with 50% or more indigenous content. The stipulated time frame to achieve the same is not encouraging either as Indian companies are now required to prove the indigenous content at the time of submission of technical bids, which implies they need to have 50% indigenous content even before the actual production begins. Far from being realistic, this move also discourages any Indian company that wants to compete at the global level.Insufficient information and the lack of clear future plans have been key challenges for both the private sector and foreign companies, in planning the development of research and development technology or the formation of joint ventures. Although the MoD has agreed to provide a public version of the long-term plan, its effectiveness remains to be seen. One of the key objectives of DPP 2009 is to enable transparency and integrity in all defense industry acquisitions. To ensure this, the Defense Acquisition Council (DAC), India's supreme defense procurement agency, has recently approved a fifteen year Long Term Integrated Perspective Plan (LTIPP) 2012-2027. The plan defines the acquisition road map for the three forces for the next 15 years. Only the Indian Navy had a perspective plan while the IAF and the army had never had such a practice. Based on the new LTIPP, a technology perspective capability road map would be made and shared with DRDO, defense public sector undertakings and the industry to enable advanced planning.Since the early 1970s, the Indian defense procurement process has included corruption, delays, and bureaucratic hurdles, due to the monopoly of the civilian bureaucracy and politicians over the purchase decisions of the armed forces. Although the armed forces are in charge of conducting trials on shortlisted equipment and forwarding their recommendations to the Ministry of Defense (MoD), any financial negotiations are conducted by civilian officials. This gives rise to the opportunity for corruption, by way of bribes and collecting money for election funds. Although India is one of the only countries to ban middle-men and brokers from operating, they are unofficially involved in almost every deal negotiated with international companies for the importation of defense equipment. Moreover, in many cases, equipment trials and negotiations drag on for decades. For instance, the IAF's acquisition of advanced jet trainers (AJTs) has been delayed by nearly a quarter of a century. Although the requirement for Hawk trainers was raised by the air force in the early 1980s, the deal could only be signed with BAE in March 2004, with the delivery of the first aircraft in 2009. In early 2013, the Italian firm AgustaWestland emerged at the center of a controversy over allegations of paying kickbacks in the INR 3600 crore ( US$ 663 million) VVIP chopper deal. Italian authorities have already made arrests during an investigation into bribes allegedly paid in 2010 by AW's parent company Finmeccanica for the deal involving the supply of a dozen helicopters for the intended use of Indian VVIPS including the Prime Minister and the President.In order to cater to the Indian defense industry, it is essential that companies develop advanced low-cost technology solutions. This is especially true in the middle tier, where the degree of sophistication is not as high as it could be. Due to low labor and infrastructure costs, the defense products developed in India are generally very competitively priced compared to imports. An example of this is HAL's advanced light helicopter, the Dhruv, which only costs US$5 million, one-third of the price of similar helicopters available from mature markets. In 2009, HAL secured a notable order for seven Dhruv helicopters from Ecuador, despite intense competition from international vendors such as Bell and Sikorsky. However, Ecuador has expressed dissatisfaction that these choppers are becoming a cause for concern due to poor after sales service, expensive spares, and even over-invoicing.

Key Highlights India's defense imports increased considerably during 2007–2011, making it the largest global defense importer in 2011. The country's imports constituted 8.5% of the total global arms transfer in 2011. The government's modernization plans, combined with the external threats faced by India, have led to the country requiring a large amount of imports to fulfill its defense requirements. Since India's domestic defense industry is limited, large amounts of its defense requirements are expected to continue being imported over the forecast period.The Indian defense expenditure is primarily driven by the need to replace the country's aging military hardware and to protect India from its hostile neighbors. Strong economic growth has also fueled India's defense industry growth. Moreover, given that the Chinese market is closed to the world, India remains the primary place within Asia where major defense systems are sold. India's defense industry is still in its early development stage, and defense exports are limited to a few neighboring countries and less developed nations such as Mauritius, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Indonesia. During the review period, ships, aircraft, and sensors were the three-most exported defense goods. Most of the current defense exports in India are offered by public sector companies. Principal exporters include Bharat Electronics, Bharat Earth Movers, Ordnance Factories Board, and Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL). The country's main exports include military hardware such as rifles, rockets, radars, and domestically developed helicopters and planes such as the light transport aircraft, Dornier 228, the advanced light helicopter, Dhruv, and the light attack helicopter, Lancer.The DAAM has been issued by the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) in order to regulate the production of arms and ammunition in the private sector. The following highlights the key points under DAAM:• The private sector is permitted to manufacture arms on a limited basis only and on the issue of an industrial license by the Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion (DIPP)• DIPP licenses are only issued to private companies agreeing to invest US$11 million (INR500 million), subject to maximum 26% FDI, and equipped with advanced manufacturing capabilities. The draft policy also prohibits the participation of small business units in arms and ammunition manufacturing• The supply of arms and ammunition is restricted to the Central Paramilitary Forces, and Defense and State Governments on a tendering or export basis. Sports weapons and non-prohibited bore (NHB) weapons can, however, be sold to license holders through registered arms dealers• The manufacturing quota of existing firms will not be enhancedDIPP has the authority to make changes in the draft policy as and when required

Table of Contents1 Introduction1.1. What is this Report About?1.2. Definitions1.3. Summary Methodology1.4. SDI Terrorism Index1.5. About Strategic Defence Intelligence2 Executive Summary3 Market Attractiveness and Emerging Opportunities3.1. Defense Market Size Historical and Forecast3.1.1. India's total defense expenditure to grow at a CAGR of XX% over the forecast period3.1.2. Hostile neighbors and modernization initiatives will be the industry's primary growth drivers3.1.3. Defense budget as a percentage of GDP will remain at an average of XX% over the forecast period3.2. Analysis of Defense Budget Allocation3.2.1. Capital expenditure allocation expected to remain at an average of XX% during the forecast period3.2.2. Army gets the largest share of the defense budget3.2.3. Defense ministry will spend US$XX billion on its army over the forecast period3.2.4. Defense ministry will spend US$XX billion on its air force over the forecast period3.2.5. Expenditure for the navy is expected to grow at a CAGR of XX% over the forecast period3.3. Homeland Security Market Size and Forecast3.3.1. India's Homeland security market estimated at US$XX billion for 20133.3.2. Cross-border terrorism and domestic insurgency to be the main factors driving homeland security3.3.3. India falls under "worst affected" of terrorism category3.3.4. India has terrorism index score of 5.13.4. Benchmarking with Key Global Markets3.4.1. India's defense budget expected to grow at a CAGR of XX%, which is one of the largest among the key global defense spenders3.4.2. The US and China dominate the global defense industry3.4.3. India allocates a lower share of its GDP for defense than countries with significant global defense expenditure3.4.4. India faces significant threat from foreign terrorist organizations3.5. Market Opportunities: Key Trends and Growth Stimulators3.5.1. Counter Terrorism3.5.2. Fighters and Multi-Role Aircraft3.5.3. Homeland Infrastructure3.5.4. Police Modernization3.5.5. Cyber Security3.5.6. Border Security3.5.7. Force Management4 Defense Procurement Market Dynamics4.1. Import Market Dynamics4.1.1. India was the largest arms importer during 2007-20114.1.2. Russia dominates Indian arms imports4.1.3. Aircraft accounted for the majority of defense imports during 2007-20114.2. Export Market Dynamics4.2.1. India's low profile in defense exports is set to change over the forecast period4.2.2. Underdeveloped nations across Asia, Africa and Latin America are the main importers of Indian defense goods5 Industry Dynamics5.1. Five Forces Analysis5.1.1. Bargaining power of supplier: low to high5.1.2. Bargaining power of buyer: high5.1.3. Barrier to entry: medium to high5.1.4. Intensity of rivalry: high5.1.5. Threat of substitution: medium to high6 Market Entry Strategy6.1. Market Regulation6.1.1. Defense Procurement Procedure (DPP) - 2011: A significant improvement6.1.2. Offset policy to drive defense industrial modernization6.1.3. Main features of revised Defense Offset Guidelines (DOG) - 20126.1.4. Private sectors permitted to produce arms and ammunition under the new Draft Arms and Ammunitions Manufacturing Policy (DAAM)6.1.5. Payment to foreign technology partners does not require governmental approval6.1.6. Foreign direct investment limited to XX% in the Indian defense sector6.2. Market Entry Route6.2.1. Foreign OEMs are forming joint ventures in order to enter the market6.2.2. India emerges as a key outsourcing hub for global defense companies6.3. Key Challenges6.3.1. Offset policy with restricted FDI of XX% is biased towards the domestic public and private sectors6.3.2. Insufficient information and transparency on future plans6.3.3. Bureaucracy, corruption, and long project delays6.3.4. Developing advanced low-cost solutions is essential to gain market share7 Competitive landscape and Strategic Insights7.1. Competitive landscape Overview7.1.1. Domestic public companies have a strong presence in the Indian defense industry7.2. Key Foreign Companies7.2.1. Lockheed Martin Corporation - overview7.2.2. Lockheed Martin Corporation - main products7.2.3. Lockheed Martin Corporation - recent announcements and strategic initiatives7.2.4. Lockheed Martin Corporation - alliances7.2.5. Lockheed Martin Corporation - recent contract wins7.2.6. BAE Systems Plc. - overview7.2.7. BAE Systems Plc. - main products and services7.2.8. BAE Systems Plc. - recent announcements and strategic initiatives7.2.9. BAE Systems Plc. - alliances 7.2.10. BAE Systems Plc. - recent contract wins 7.2.11. Thales - overview 7.2.12. Thales - main products and services 7.2.13. Thales - recent announcements and strategic initiatives 7.2.14. Thales - alliances 7.2.15. Thales - recent contract wins7.3. Key Public Sector Companies7.3.1. Mazagon Docks Limited - overview7.3.2. Mazagon Docks Limited - main products and services7.3.3. Mazagon Docks Limited - recent announcements and strategic initiatives7.3.4. Mazagon Docks Limited - alliances7.3.5. Mazagon Docks Limited - recent contract wins7.3.6. Mazagon Docks Limited - financial analysis7.3.7. Hindustan Aeronautics Limited - overview7.3.8. Hindustan Aeronautics Limited - main products and services7.3.9. Hindustan Aeronautics Limited - recent announcements and strategic initiatives 7.3.10. Hindustan Aeronautics Limited - alliances 7.3.11. Hindustan Aeronautics Limited - recent contract wins 7.3.12. Hindustan Aeronautics Limited - financial analysis 7.3.13. Bharat Electronics Limited - overview 7.3.14. Bharat Electronics Limited - main products and services 7.3.15. Bharat Electronics Limited - recent announcements and strategic initiatives 7.3.16. Bharat Electronics Limited - alliances 7.3.17. Bharat Electronics Limited - recent contract wins 7.3.18. Bharat Electronics Limited - financial analysis 7.3.19. Bharat Dynamics Limited - overview 7.3.20. Bharat Dynamics Limited - main products and services 7.3.21. Bharat Dynamics Limited - recent announcements and strategic initiatives 7.3.22. Bharat Dynamics Limited - alliances 7.3.23. Bharat Dynamics Limited - recent contract wins 7.3.24. Bharat Dynamics Limited - financial analysis 7.3.25. Ordnance Factory Board - overview 7.3.26. Ordinance Factory Board - main products and services 7.3.27. Ordinance Factory Board - recent announcements and strategic initiatives 7.3.28. Ordinance Factory Board - alliances 7.3.29. Ordinance Factory Board - recent contract wins 7.3.30. Ordinance Factory Board - financial analysis 7.3.31. BEML - overview 7.3.32. BEML - main products and services 7.3.33. BEML - recent announcements and strategic initiatives 7.3.34. BEML - alliances 7.3.35. BEML - financial analysis 7.3.36. Goa Shipyard Limited - overview 7.3.37. Goa Shipyard Limited - main products and services 7.3.38. Goa Shipyard Limited - recent announcements and strategic initiatives 7.3.39. Goa Shipyard Limited - alliances 7.3.40. Goa Shipyard Limited - recent contract wins 7.3.41. Goa Shipyard Limited - financial analysis7.4. Key Private Sector Companies7.4.1. Tata Advanced Systems Limited - overview7.4.2. Tata Advanced Systems Limited - main products and services7.4.3. Tata Advanced Systems Limited - recent announcements and strategic initiatives7.4.4. Tata Advanced Systems Limited - alliances7.4.5. Tata Advanced Systems Limited - recent contract wins7.4.6. Mahindra Defense Systems - overview7.4.7. Mahindra Defense Systems - main products and services7.4.8. Mahindra Defense Systems - recent announcements and strategic initiatives7.4.9. Mahindra Defense Systems - alliances 7.4.10. Mahindra Defense Systems - financial analysis8 Business Environment and Country Risk8.1. Demographics and Social Statistics8.1.1. Population - Total rural population8.1.2. Population - Total urban population8.1.3. Population - Number of Households8.2. Economic Performance8.2.1. GDP Per Capita, USD8.2.2. GDP (current USD Billion)8.2.3. Exports of goods and services (current USD Billion)8.2.4. Imports of goods and services (current USD Billion)8.2.5. Gross National Disposable Income (USD Billion)8.2.6. Manufacturing Output (USD Billion)8.2.7. Consumer Price Index8.2.8. Wholesale Price Index8.2.9. LCU per USD (period average) 8.2.10. LCU per EUR (period average) 8.2.11. Lending Rate (%) 8.2.12. Real Interest Rate (%) 8.2.13. Market Capitalization of Listed Companies (USD Billion) 8.2.14. Market Capitalization of Listed Companies (% of GDP) 8.2.15. Total Government Cash Surplus/Deficit (LCU Billion) 8.2.16. Total Government cash surplus/deficit as % of GDP (LCU) 8.2.17. Central Government Debt (LCU Billion) 8.2.18. Central Government Debt as a percentage of GDP (LCU) 8.2.19. Goods exports as a percentage of GDP 8.2.20. Goods imports as a percentage of GDP 8.2.21. Goods balance as a percentage of GDP 8.2.22. Services imports as a percentage of GDP 8.2.23. Services Exports as a percentage of GDP 8.2.24. Services balance as a percentage of GDP 8.2.25. Foreign direct investment, net (BoP, current US$ Billion) 8.2.26. Net Foreign direct investment as a percentage of GDP 8.2.27. International reserves, including gold (USD Billion) 8.2.28. External Debt (USD Billion) 8.2.29. External debt as percentage of GDP8.3. Energy and Utilities8.3.1. Total Conventional Thermal Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours)8.3.2. Hydroelectricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours)8.3.3. Nuclear Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours)8.3.4. Total Conventional Thermal Electricity Installed Capacity (Million Kilowatts)8.3.5. Total Electricity Exports (Billion Kilowatt hours)8.3.6. Total Electricity Imports (Billion Kilowatt hours)8.3.7. Proved Reserves of Natural Gas (Trillion Cubic Feet)8.3.8. Total Petroleum Consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day)8.3.9. Crude Oil Proved Reserves (Billion Barrels) 8.3.10. Total Non-Hydro Renewable Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatts)8.4. Infrastructure Quality and Availability8.4.1. Rail lines (total route - km)8.4.2. Air transport, freight (million ton-km)8.5. Minerals8.5.1. Mining, Manufacturing, and Utilities Output (USD Bn)8.6. Technology8.6.1. Patents granted8.7. Telecommunication8.7.1. Telephone lines (In Mn)8.7.2. Telephone Lines Penetration Rate (per 100 people)9 Appendix9.1. About SDI9.2. Disclaimer

List of TablesTable 1: Indian Defense Expenditure, 2009-2013 Table 2: Indian Defense Expenditure, 2014-2018 Table 3: Indian GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP Growth, 2009-2013 Table 4: Indian GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP Growth, 2014-2018 Table 5: Indian Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2009-2013 Table 6: Indian Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2014-2018 Table 7: Indian Defense Budget Split (%), 2009-2013 Table 8: Indian Defense Budget Split (%), 2014-2018 Table 9: Indian Defense Expenditure for Army (US$ Billion), 2009-2013 Table 10: Indian Defense Expenditure for Army (US$ Billion), 2014-2018 Table 11: Indian Defense Expenditure for Air Force (US$ Billion), 2009-2013 Table 12: Indian Defense Expenditure for Air Force (US$ Billion), 2014-2018 Table 13: Indian Defense Expenditure for Navy (US$ Billion), 2009-2013 Table 14: Indian Defense Expenditure for Navy (US$ Billion), 2014-2018 Table 15: Benchmarking with Key Markets - 2008-2012 vs. 2013-2017 Table 16: SDI Terrorism Index Table 17: Offset Policy in India Table 18: Market Entry Strategies and Key Objectives of Foreign Companies in the Indian Defense Sector Table 19: Key Players and their Operations in the Indian Defense Industry Table 20: Scale of Operations of Domestic Public Sector Companies in the Indian Defense Industry Table 21: Lockheed Martin Corporation - Main Products Table 22: Lockheed Martin Corporation - Alliances Table 23: Lockheed Martin Corporation - Recent Contract Wins Table 24: BAE Systems Plc. - Main Products and Services Table 25: BAE Systems Plc. - Alliances Table 26: BAE Systems Plc. - Recent Contract Wins Table 27: Thales - Main Products and Services Table 28: Thales - Alliances Table 29: Thales - Recent Contract Wins Table 30: Mazagon Docks Limited - Main Products and Services Table 31: Mazagon Docks Limited - Alliances Table 32: Mazagon Docks Limited - Recent Contract Wins Table 33: Hindustan Aeronautics Limited - Main Products and Services Table 34: Hindustan Aeronautics Limited - Alliances Table 35: Hindustan Aeronautics Limited - Recent Contract Wins Table 36: Bharat Electronics Limited - Major Products and Services Table 37: Bharat Electronics Limited - Alliances Table 38: Bharat Electronics Limited - Recent Contract Wins Table 39: Bharat Dynamics Limited - Main Products and Services Table 40: Bharat Dynamics Limited - Alliances Table 41: Bharat Dynamics Limited - Recent Contract Wins Table 42: Ordinance Factory Board - Main Products and Services Table 43: Ordinance Factory Board - Alliances Table 44: Ordinance Factory Board - Recent Contract Wins Table 45: BEML - Main Products and Services Table 46: BEML - Alliances Table 47: Goa Shipyard Limited - Main Products and Services Table 48: Goa Shipyard Limited - Alliances Table 49: Goa Shipyard Limited - Recent Contract Wins Table 50: Tata Advanced Systems Limited - Main Products and Services Table 51: Tata Advanced Systems Limited - Alliances Table 52: Tata Advanced Systems Limited - Recent Contract Wins Table 53: Mahindra Defense Systems - Main Products and Services Table 54: Mahindra Defense Systems - Alliances

List of FiguresFigure 1: Indian Defense Expenditure, 2009-2013 Figure 2: Indian Defense Expenditure, 2014-2018 Figure 3: Indian GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP Growth, 2009-2013 Figure 4: Indian GDP Growth vs. Defense Expenditure Growth and Defense Expenditure as Percentage of GDP Growth, 2014-2018 Figure 5: Indian Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2009-2013 Figure 6: Indian Defense Budget Split Between Capital and Revenue Expenditure (%), 2014-2018 Figure 7: Indian Defense Budget Split (%), 2009-2013 Figure 8: Indian Defense Budget Split (%), 2014-2018 Figure 9: Indian Defense Expenditure for Army (US$ Billion), 2009-2013 Figure 10: Indian Defense Expenditure for Army (US$ Billion), 2014-2018 Figure 11: Indian Defense Expenditure for Air Force (US$ Billion), 2009-2013 Figure 12: Indian Defense Expenditure for Air Force (US$ Billion), 2014-2018 Figure 13: Indian Defense Expenditure for Navy (US$ Billion), 2009-2013 Figure 14: Indian Defense Expenditure for Navy (US$ Billion), 2014-2018 Figure 15: Break-up of Central Armed Police Forces Expenditure (%), 2011 Figure 16: SDI Terrorism Heat Map, 2012 Figure 17: SDI Terrorism Index Figure 18: Benchmarking with Key Markets - 2008-2012 vs. 2013-2017 Figure 19: Defense Expenditure of the World's Largest Military Spenders (US$ Billion), 2012 and 2017 Figure 20: Defense Expenditure as a Percentage of GDP of Largest Military Spenders (%), 2012 Figure 21: Counter Terrorism Market Size (US$ Billion), 2012-2022 Figure 22: Fighters and Multi-Role Aircraft Market Size (US$ Billion), 2012-2022 Figure 23: Homeland Infrastructure Market Size (US$ Billion), 2012-2022 Figure 24: Police Modernization (US$ Billion), 2012-2022 Figure 25: Cyber Security (US$ Billion), 2012-2022 Figure 26: Border Security (US$ Billion), 2012-2022 Figure 27: Force Management (US$ Billion), 2012-2022 Figure 28: Indian Defense Import Trend (US$ Million), 2007-2011 (TIV values*) Figure 29: Country-wise Break-up of Indian Defense Imports (%), 2007-2011 (TIV values*) Figure 30: Weapon Category Break-up of Indian Defense Imports (%), 2007-2011 (TIV values*) Figure 31: Indian Defense Export Trend (US$ Million), 2007-2011 (TIV values*) Figure 32: Country-wise Break-up of Indian Defense Exports (%), 2007-2011 (TIV values*) Figure 33: Industry Dynamics - Porter's Five Forces Analysis Figure 34: Bharat Electronics Limited - Revenue Trend Analysis (INR Billion), 2007-2011 Figure 35: BEML - Revenue Trend Analysis (INR Billion), 2007-2011 Figure 36: Mahindra Defense Systems - Revenue and Production Trend Analysis (INR Billion), 2007-2011 Figure 37: Mahindra Defense Systems - Net Profit Trend Analysis (INR Million), 2007-2011 Figure 38: Indian Population - Rural Population (In Millions), 2008-2017 Figure 39: Indian Population - Urban Population (In Millions), 2008-2017 Figure 40: Indian Population - Number of Households (In Millions), 2008-2017 Figure 41: GDP Per Capita in USD, 2008-2017 Figure 42: GDP (current USD billion) 2008-2017 Figure 43: Exports of goods and services (current USD Billion) - 2004-2013 Figure 44: Imports of goods and services (current USD Billion) - 2004-2013 Figure 45: Gross National Disposable Income (USD Billion) - 2004-2013 Figure 46: Manufacturing Output (USD Billion) - 2004-2013 Figure 47: Consumer Price Index - 2008-2017 Figure 48: Wholesale Price Index - 2004-2013 Figure 49: LCU per USD (period average) - 2008-2017 Figure 50: LCU per USD (period average) - 2008-2017 Figure 51: Lending Rate (%) - 2004-2013 Figure 52: Real Interest Rate (%) - 2004-2013 Figure 53: Market Capitalization of Listed Companies - 2004-2013 Figure 54: Market Capitalization of Listed Companies (% of GDP)- 2004-2013 Figure 55: Total Government Cash Surplus/Deficit (LCU Billion) 2003-2012 Figure 56: Total Government Cash Surplus/Deficit as % of GDP (LCU) 2003-2012 Figure 57: Central Government Debt (LCU Billion) - 2003-2012 Figure 58: Central Government Debt as a percentage of GDP - 2003-2012 Figure 59: Goods exports as a percentage of GDP - 2003-2012 Figure 60: Goods imports as a percentage of GDP - 2003-2012 Figure 61: Goods balance as a percentage of GDP - 2003-2012 Figure 62: Service imports as a percentage of GDP - 2003-2012 Figure 63: Services exports as a percentage of GDP - 2003-2012 Figure 64: Services balance as a percentage of GDP - 2003-2012 Figure 65: Foreign direct investment, net (BoP, current US$ Billion) - 2003-2012 Figure 66: Net Foreign direct investment as a percentage of GDP - 2003-2012 Figure 67: International reserves, including gold (USD Billion) - 2004-2013 Figure 68: External Debt (USD Billion) - 2003-2012 Figure 69: External Debt as a percentage of GDP - 2003-2012 Figure 70: Total Conventional Thermal Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours) - 2003-2012 Figure 71: Hydroelectricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours) - 2003-2012 Figure 72: Nuclear Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatt hours) - 2003-2012 Figure 73: Total Conventional Thermal Electricity Installed Capacity (Million Kilowatts) - 2003-2012 Figure 74: Total Electricity Exports (Billion Kilowatt hours) - 2003-2012 Figure 75: Total Electricity Imports (Billion Kilowatt hours) - 2003-2012 Figure 76: The Proved Reserves of Natural Gas (Trillion Cubic Feet) - 2004-2013 Figure 77: Total Petroleum Consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) - 2004-2013 Figure 78: The Proved Reserves of Crude Oil (Billion Barrels) - 2004-2013 Figure 79: Total Non-Hydro Renewable Electricity Net Generation (Billion Kilowatts) - 2003-2012 Figure 80: Rail lines (total route - km) - 2003-2012 Figure 81: Air transport, freight (million ton-km) 2003-2012 Figure 82: Mining, Manufacturing, Utilities Output (USD Bn), 2003-2013 Figure 83: Patents granted - 2004-2013 Figure 84: Telephone Lines (In Mn), 2003-2012 Figure 85: Telephone lines Penetration Rate (per 100 people) 2004-2013

Companies MentionedLockheed Martin Corp, BAE Systems Plc, Thales, Mazagon Docks Ltd, Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd, Bharat Electronics Ltd, Bharat Dynamics Ltd, ,Ordnance Factory Board ,BEML ,

To order this report: Future of the Indian Defense Industry - Market Attractiveness, Competitive Landscape and Forecasts to 2018

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