This account is pending registration confirmation. Please click on the link within the confirmation email previously sent you to complete registration.
Need a new registration confirmation email? Click here
TheStreet Open House

5 Reasons the NFL Should Fix Blackouts Next

2. The blackouts themselves aren't working: After spending two seasons with much of the home slate blacked out, fans in Tampa seem just fine with keeping billionaire owner Malcolm Glazer's team off local airwaves while he tinkers with Machester United and takes $15 million for 30 years from taxpayers to maintain Tampa's Raymond James (RJF) Stadium. In the words of the folks at SportsFans.org, "The Bucs owners either 1) don't actually care about their fans or 2) don't realize that they're only exacerbating the waning interest in their team by continuing to black out game after game or 3) both."

It's a similar situation in San Diego, where billionaire owner Alex Spanos wants a new facility but spurned the new NFL blackout policy that would keep home games on air. Fans are OK with paying to watch a game, but professional stadium politics isn't that game.

3. Blackouts = blackmail: Why didn't the Chargers embrace the NFL's lower blackout threshold? Let team spokesman Bill Johnson explain, as he did to NFL San Diego this year:

"Lowering the benchmark to 85% would substantially impact our ticket revenues. A team like the Chargers, whose revenues are already limited by an older, antiquated stadium, can't afford to lose such an import revenue stream."

Did you catch that? San Diego's blackouts are the stadium's fault and it's the taxpayer's fault for not giving the team the shiny new plaything it wants. Buffalo has taken a similar stance on desired improvements to Ralph Wilson Stadium, saying the hundreds of millions in renovations are necessary to update a stadium where attendance isn't what it used to be. Both franchises have had no problem blacking out local fans in recent years and each has openly flirted with other towns -- the Chargers with L.A. and Chula Vista and the Bills with Toronto. The not so subtle message is that if taxpayers don't pony up, the team is gone. It's a move that worked without blackouts in Minnesota earlier this year, but blackouts don't seem to have changed many minds in the aforementioned blackout markets.

4. The league is now blacking out paying customers: Fans have already petitioned the Federal Communications Commission to make it reconsider cable and satellite television's blackout rules, but just about every fan pays into the television infrastructure the NFL uses. Not only do their taxes maintain public airwaves, but their cable and satellite fees support ESPN (DIS), the NFL Network and other channels that show local teams. Perhaps the strongest argument comes from fans who pay hundreds of dollars a year for DirecTV's (DTV) Sunday Ticket and still can't watch blacked-out local games. When the argument changes from "Cough it up, cheapskate" to "Cough up some more, cheapskate," you're treading the fine line between commerce and extortion.

5. It's about to get far worse: Since the mid-'90s, Los Angeles lay fallow as an NFL city. Promises to move a team there have been as empty as Los Angeles Coliseum on an NFL Sunday. Now, thanks to the Los Angeles City Council, every small-market NFL team's nightmare is now a reality. Last month the council unanimously approved plans to build a $1.5 billion stadium in Downtown Los Angeles, which means owners complaining about old stadiums in San Diego, St. Louis and Buffalo or worried about delicate attendance figures in Jacksonville now have a boogeyman to frighten the faithful into compliance.

"We're not trying to steal a franchise and we're not trying to force them to move before they make a decision to move," Tim Leiweke, CEO of Anschutz Entertainment Group, the company behind the project, told ESPN. "That's up to the individual owners out there today. But we will be very active in letting them know, despite what a lot of people thought, we have a deal with the city, we've gone through this process and we are shovel-ready."

The problem is that tactic doesn't always work. Los Angeles is the only market the NFL has completely abandoned since the Portsmouth Spartans left Ohio in 1934. The NFL doesn't like losing markets of any size and any move will likely leave a temporary vacancy. Just because a market's fans can't support a team during a down economy doesn't mean they won't pack the place when it inevitably bounces back.

-- Written by Jason Notte in Portland, Ore.

>To contact the writer of this article, click here: Jason Notte.

>To follow the writer on Twitter, go to http://twitter.com/notteham.

>To submit a news tip, send an email to: tips@thestreet.com.

RELATED STORIES:



Jason Notte is a reporter for TheStreet. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Huffington Post, Esquire.com, Time Out New York, the Boston Herald, the Boston Phoenix, the Metro newspaper and the Colorado Springs Independent. He previously served as the political and global affairs editor for Metro U.S., layout editor for Boston Now, assistant news editor for the Herald News of West Paterson, N.J., editor of Go Out! Magazine in Hoboken, N.J., and copy editor and lifestyle editor at the Jersey Journal in Jersey City, N.J.
2 of 2

Select the service that is right for you!

COMPARE ALL SERVICES
Action Alerts PLUS
Try it NOW

Jim Cramer and Stephanie Link actively manage a real portfolio and reveal their money management tactics while giving advanced notice before every trade.

Product Features:
  • $2.5+ million portfolio
  • Large-cap and dividend focus
  • Intraday trade alerts from Cramer
  • Weekly roundups
TheStreet Quant Ratings
Try it NOW
Only $49.95/yr

Access the tool that DOMINATES the Russell 2000 and the S&P 500.

Product Features:
  • Buy, hold, or sell recommendations for over 4,300 stocks
  • Unlimited research reports on your favorite stocks
  • A custom stock screener
  • Upgrade/downgrade alerts
Stocks Under $10
Try it NOW

David Peltier, uncovers low dollar stocks with extraordinary upside potential that are flying under Wall Street's radar.

Product Features:
  • Model portfolio
  • Stocks trading below $10
  • Intraday trade alerts
  • Weekly roundups
Dividend Stock Advisor
Try it NOW

Jim Cramer's protege, David Peltier, identifies the best of breed dividend stocks that will pay a reliable AND significant income stream.

Product Features:
  • Diversified model portfolio of dividend stocks
  • Alerts when market news affect the portfolio
  • Bi-weekly updates with exact steps to take - BUY, HOLD, SELL
Real Money Pro
Try it NOW

All of Real Money, plus 15 more of Wall Street's sharpest minds delivering actionable trading ideas, a comprehensive look at the market, and fundamental and technical analysis.

Product Features:
  • Real Money + Doug Kass Plus 15 more Wall Street Pros
  • Intraday commentary & news
  • Ultra-actionable trading ideas
Options Profits
Try it NOW

Our options trading pros provide daily market commentary and over 100 monthly option trading ideas and strategies to help you become a well-seasoned trader.

Product Features:
  • 100+ monthly options trading ideas
  • Actionable options commentary & news
  • Real-time trading community
  • Options TV
To begin commenting right away, you can log in below using your Disqus, Facebook, Twitter, OpenID or Yahoo login credentials. Alternatively, you can post a comment as a "guest" just by entering an email address. Your use of the commenting tool is subject to multiple terms of service/use and privacy policies - see here for more details.
Submit an article to us!
DOW 17,265.99 +109.14 0.64%
S&P 500 2,011.36 +9.79 0.49%
NASDAQ 4,593.4250 +31.2360 0.68%

Brokerage Partners

Rates from Bankrate.com

  • Mortgage
  • Credit Cards
  • Auto

Free Newsletters from TheStreet

My Subscriptions:

After the Bell

Before the Bell

Booyah! Newsletter

Midday Bell

TheStreet Top 10 Stories

Winners & Losers

Register for Newsletters
Top Rated Stocks Top Rated Funds Top Rated ETFs